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Media Effects

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Media Effects provides students with an in-depth understanding of how the media are constantly influencing individuals and society. W. James Potter guides readers through the extensive body of research on the effects of the mass media by organizing the book around two Media Effects Templates. The first template helps organize thinking about media influences on individuals, and the second focuses on media influences on larger social structures and institutions. Throughout the book, Potter encourages students to analyze their own experiences tby searching for evidence of these effects in their own lives, making the content meaningful.

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Media, Culture and Society: An Introduction 2nd Edition

‘In his beautifully balanced, clear and broad-ranging account of a fast-changing field, Paul Hodkinson has successfully brought together myriad perspectives with which to critically analyse today’s media culture and media society.’- Sonia Livingstone, Professor of Media & Communication, LSE Paul Hodkinson’s bestseller is back, once again exploring the concepts and complexities of the media in an accessible, balanced and engaging style. Additions to the Second Edition include: * A new chapter on advertising and sponsorship * Extensive revision and updating throughout all chapters * New material on technologies, censorship, online news, fan cultures and representations of poverty * Greater emphasis on and examples of digital, interactive and mobile media throughout * Fully reworked chapter on media, community and difference * Up-to-date examples covering everything from social media, contemporary advertising, news events and mobile technologies, to representations of class, ethnicity and gender. Combining a critical survey of the field with a finely judged assessment of cutting-edge developments, this Second Edition cements its reputation as the must-have text for any undergraduate student studying media, culture and society.

About the Author

Paul Hodkinson is a sociologist whose work is focused upon youth cultures, online communications and on the relationships between media and cultural identities. He has conducted extensive research on goth subculture and is author of Goth. Identity, Style and Subculture (2002, Oxford: Berg). He is also co-editor of Youth Cultures: Scenes, Subcultures and Tribes (2007, London: Routledge). He is currently researching young people’s use of online communications – notably through social networking sites. He is based in the Department of Sociology at the University of Surrey. He joined the department of sociology in August 2003. He was previously Senior Lecturer in Media Studies at University College Northampton and prior to that, he studied at the University of Birmingham at undergraduate and postgraduate level.

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Surviving Images: Cinema, War, and Cultural Memory in the Middle East

Surviving Images explores the prominent role of cinema in the development of cultural memory around war and conflict in colonial and postcolonial contexts. It does so through a study of three historical eras: the colonial period, the national-independence struggle, and the postcolonial. Beginning with a study of British colonial cinema on the Sudan, then exploring anti-colonial cinema in Algeria, Egypt and Tunisia, followed by case studies of films emerging from postcolonial contexts in Palestine, Iran, Lebanon, and Israel, this work aims to fill a gap in the critical literature on both Middle Eastern cinemas, and to contribute more broadly to scholarship on social trauma and cultural memory in colonial and postcolonial contexts. This work treats the concept of trauma critically, however, and posits that social trauma must be understood as a framework for producing social and political meaning out of these historical events. Social trauma thus sets out a productive process of historical interpretation, and cultural texts such as cinematic works both illuminate and contribute to this process. Through these discussions, Surviving Images illustrates cinema’s productive role in contributing to the changing dynamics of cultural memory of war and social conflict in the modern world.

About the Author

Kamran Rastegar is Associate Professor of Arabic Literature and Culture at Tufts University.

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Exploring Journalism And The Media 2nd Edition

Introduce your students to the exciting world of journalism using the hands-on, relevant approach of EXPLORING JOURNALISM AND THE MEDIA, 2e. The instructional model presents timeless concepts and applications that will prepare students for scholastic journalism, as well as lay the ground work for future classes, jobs, and careers. Author Lorrie Lynch’s experience as a USA Today journalist gives a unique perspective absent from most other journalism textbooks. Profiles of real journalists, authentic student writings from scholastic publications, 21st Century Career Skills, and discussion on legal issues and editorial ethics will help students connect to the curriculum. EXPLORING JOURNALISM AND THE MEDIA, 2e will not only introduce students to the many different journalism career opportunities, but will also help them perform better in the classroom by providing academic connections, grammar tips, critical thinking activities, and writing activities.

About the Author

Lorrie Lynch is a news, feature and contemporary culture writer and editor with more than two decades of experience in the print and Web journalism worlds. Lynch is a channel editor at AARP.org, the website of the membership association for those 50-plus. Working in multi-media, she oversees all food and entertainment coverage on the website as well as develops special projects for the organization. Before her work at AARP, Lynch was at USA TODAY and its Sunday magazine USA WEEKEND, carried in 700 newspapers. She was on USA TODAY’s founding staff and worked as a reporter, San Francisco Bureau Chief and People editor. At USA WEEKEND, she was a senior editor, celebrity columnist and blogger. Lynch also worked in news at papers in California and Michigan, where she won several writing awards. She teaches writing for communication in the School of Communication at American University and is a communications consultant in Washington, D.C., where she lives with her husband, a USA TODAY editor. Lynch earned her B.A. in Journalism at Central Michigan University. In November 2007 she was inducted into CMU’s Journalism Hall of Fame.

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Global Media Studies

Global Media Studies is unique in its coverage of places, peoples, institutions, and discourses. Toby Miller and Marwan M. Kraidy provide a comprehensive how-to guide to the study of media, going far beyond the established English-language literature and drawing on the best methods and research from around the world. They look at political economy, global policymaking and governance, and the past and present manifestations of cultural imperialism. In addition to providing a survey of the field, the book introduces a new form of textual analysis, with a special focus on reality television, as well as models of audience research. The authors include original analyses of the US, European, Latin American, and Arab worlds, and case studies of mobile telephony, the impact of US media, and reality television. This original and uniquely global textbook will be an essential resource for students of global media and international communication.

About the Author

Toby Miller is Professor Emeritus at the University of California, Riverside; Sir Walter Murdoch Professor of Cultural Policy Studies, Murdoch University; Profesor Invitado, Escuela de Comunicacion Social, Universidad del Norte; Professor of Journalism, Media and Cultural Studies, Cardiff University/Prifysgol Caerdydd; and Director of the Institute of Media and Creative Industries, Loughborough University London. Marwan M. Kraidy is the Anthony Shadid Chair in Global Media, Politics and Culture and Director of the Center for Advanced Research in Global Communication at the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania.

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The Ordinary Man of Cinema (Semiotext(e) / Foreign Agents)

When it was first published in French in 1980, The Ordinary Man of Cinema signaled a shift from the French film criticism of the 1960s to a new breed of film philosophy that disregarded the semiotics and post-structuralism of the preceding decades. Schefer describes the schizophrenic subjectivity the cinema offers us: the film as a work projected without memory, viewed by (and thereby lived by) a subject scarred and shaped by memory. The Ordinary Man of Cinema delineates the phenomenology of movie-going and the fleeting, impalpable zone in which an individual’s personal memory confronts the cinema’s ideological images to create a new way of thinking. It is also a book replete with mummies and vampires, tyrants and prostitutes, murderers and freaks — figures that are fundamental to Schefer’s conception of the cinema, because the worlds that cinema traverses (our worlds, interior and exterior) are worlds of pain, unconscious desire, decay, repressed violence, and the endless mystery of the body. Fear and pleasure breed monsters, and such are what Schefer’s emblematic “ordinary man” seeks and encounters when engaging in the disordering of the ordinary that the movie theater offers him. Among other things, Schefer considers “The Gods” in 31 brief essays on film stills and “The Criminal Life” with reflections on spectatorship and autobiography. While Schefer’s book has long been standard reading in French film scholarship, until now it has been something of a missing link to the field (and more broadly, French theory) in English. It is one of the building blocks of more widely known and read translations of Gilles Deleuze (who cited this book as an influence on his own cinema books) and Jacques Ranciere.

About the Author

Jean Louis Schefer (born in 1938) is a prolific and influential scholar of art history, theology, philosophy, music, and linguistics, as well as an author of fiction.

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The Marketplace of Attention: How Audiences Take Shape in a Digital Age (MIT Press)

Feature films, television shows, homemade videos, tweets, blogs, and breaking news: digital media offer an always-accessible, apparently inexhaustible supply of entertainment and information. Although choices seems endless, public attention is not. How do digital media find the audiences they need in an era of infinite choice? In The Marketplace of Attention, James Webster explains how audiences take shape in the digital age. Webster describes the factors that create audiences, including the preferences and habits of media users, the role of social networks, the resources and strategies of media providers, and the growing impact of media measures — from ratings to user recommendations. He incorporates these factors into one comprehensive framework: the marketplace of attention. In doing so, he shows that the marketplace works in ways that belie our greatest hopes and fears about digital media. Some observers claim that digital media empower a new participatory culture; others fear that digital media encourage users to retreat to isolated enclaves. Webster shows that public attention is at once diverse and concentrated — that users move across a variety of outlets, producing high levels of audience overlap. So although audiences are fragmented in ways that would astonish midcentury broadcasting executives, Webster argues that this doesn’t signal polarization. He questions whether our preferences are immune from media influence, and he describes how our encounters with media might change our tastes. In the digital era’s marketplace of attention, Webster claims, we typically encounter ideas that cut across our predispositions. In the process, we will remake the marketplace of ideas and reshape the twenty-first century public sphere.

About the Author

James G. Webster is Professor in the School of Communication at Northwestern University. The Marketplace of Attention: How Audiences Take Shape in a Digital Age.

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Beyond New Media: Discourse and Critique in a Polymediated Age (Studies in New Media) Reprint Edition

Beyond New Media: Discourse and Critique in a Polymediated Age examines a host of differing positions on media in order to explore how those positions can inform one another and build a basis for future engagements with media theory, research, and practice. Herbig, Herrmann, and Tyma have brought together a number of media scholars with differing paradigmatic backgrounds to debate the relative applicability of existing theories and in doing so develop a new approach: polymediation. Each contributor’s disciplinary background is diverse, spanning interpersonal communication, media studies, organizational communication, instructional design, rhetoric, mass communication, gender studies, popular culture studies, informatics, and persuasion. Although each of these scholars brings with them a unique perspective on media’s role in people’s lives, what binds them together is the belief that meaningful discourse about media must be an ongoing conversation that is open to critique and revision in a rapidly changing mediated culture. By studying media in a polymediated way, Beyond New Media addresses more completely our complex relationship to media(tion) in our everyday lives.

About the Author

Art Herbig is assistant professor of media production at Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne. Andrew F. Herrmann is assistant professor of communication studies at East Tennessee State University. Adam W. Tyma is associate professor of critical media studies at the University of Nebraska at Omaha.

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How Video Games Impact Players: The Pitfalls and Benefits of a Gaming Society

How Video Games Impact Players provides a balanced and nuanced look at the complex role that video games play in society through an analysis of the positive and negative effects of game rules, feedback, and self-presentation. Rogers examines the positive aspects of video games like their use in education, encouragement of prosocial behaviors, and enablement of mood management, as well as the negative aspects like their association with violence and diversity issues, promotion of substance use behaviors, and their role as an outlet for harassment behaviors.

About the Author

Ryan Rogers is an assistant professor at Marist College.

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Restricted Access: Media, Disability, and the Politics of Participation

While digital media can offer many opportunities for civic and cultural participation, this technology is not equally easy for everyone to use. Hardware, software, and cultural expectations combine to make some technologies an easier fit for some bodies than for others. A YouTube video without closed captions or a social network site that is incompatible with a screen reader can restrict the access of users who are hard of hearing or visually impaired. Often, people with disabilities require accommodation, assistive technologies, or other forms of aid to make digital media accessible-useable-for them. Restricted Access investigates digital media accessibility-the processes by which media is made usable by people with particular needs-and argues for the necessity of conceptualizing access in a way that will enable greater participation in all forms of mediated culture. Drawing on disability and cultural studies, Elizabeth Ellcessor uses an interrogatory framework based around issues of regulation, use, content, form, and experience to examine contemporary digital media. Through interviews with policy makers and accessibility professionals, popular culture and archival materials, and an ethnographic study of internet use by people with disabilities, Ellcessor reveals the assumptions that undergird contemporary technologies and participatory cultures. Restricted Access makes the crucial point that if digital media open up opportunities for individuals to create and participate, but that technology only facilitates the participation of those who are already privileged, then its progressive potential remains unrealized. Engagingly written with powerful examples, Ellcessor demonstrates the importance of alternate uses, marginalized voices, and invisible innovations in the context of disability identities to push us to rethink digital media accessibility.

About the Author

Elizabeth Ellcessor is Assistant Professor of cinema and media studies at Indiana University-Bloomington.

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Whose Global Village?: Rethinking How Technology Shapes Our World

In the digital age, technology has shrunk the physical world into a global village, where we all seem to be connected as an online community as information travels to the farthest reaches of the planet with the click of a mouse. Yet while we think of platforms such as Twitter and Facebook as open and accessible to all, in reality, these are commercial entities developed primarily by and for the Western world. Considering how new technologies increasingly shape labor, economics, and politics, these tools often reinforce the inequalities of globalization, rarely reflecting the perspectives of those at the bottom of the digital divide. This book asks us to re-consider whose global village we are shaping with the digital technology revolution today. Sharing stories of collaboration with Native Americans in California and New Mexico, revolutionaries in Egypt, communities in rural India, and others across the world, Ramesh Srinivasan urges us to re-imagine what the Internet, mobile phones, or social media platforms may look like when considered from the perspective of diverse cultures. Such collaborations can pave the way for a people-first approach toward designing and working with new technology worldwide. Whose Global Village seeks to inspire professionals, activists, and scholars alike to think about technology in a way that embraces the realities of communities too often relegated to the margins. We can then start to visualize a world where technologies serve diverse communities rather than just the Western consumer.”

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Asian American Media Activism: Fighting for Cultural Citizenship (Critical Cultural Communication)

Among the most well-known YouTubers are a cadre of talented Asian American performers, including comedian Ryan Higa and makeup artist Michelle Phan. Yet beneath the sheen of these online success stories lies a problem-Asian Americans remain sorely underrepresented in mainstream film and television. When they do appear on screen, they are often relegated to demeaning stereotypes such as the comical foreigner, the sexy girlfriend, or the martial arts villain. The story that remains untold is that as long as these inequities have existed, Asian Americans have been fighting back-joining together to protest offensive imagery, support Asian American actors and industry workers, and make their voices heard. Providing a cultural history and ethnography, Asian American Media Activism assesses everything from grassroots collectives in the 1970s up to contemporary engagements by fan groups, advertising agencies, and users on YouTube and Twitter. In linking these different forms of activism, Lori Kido Lopez investigates how Asian American media activism takes place and evaluates what kinds of interventions are most effective. Ultimately, Lopez finds that activists must be understood as fighting for cultural citizenship, a deeper sense of belonging and acceptance within a nation that has long rejected them.

About the Author

Lori Kido Lopez is Assistant Professor of Media and Cultural Studies in the Communication Arts Department and an affiliate of the Asian American Studies and Gender and Women's Studies Departments at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

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