Showing 1–20 of 69 results

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“I Have a Dream”: A 50th Year Testament to the March that Changed America

On August 28, 1963, something quite amazing occurred. On that day, one of the largest political rallies ever took place in support of civil and economic rights of African-Americans, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., standing in front of the Lincoln Memorial, gave one of the most stirring speeches in history when he delivered his “I Have a Dream” speech. This book is a celebration of the 50th anniversary of this address and includes narrative and more than 100 stunning photos from the march in Birmingham, Alabama, through the March on Washington. The photographs come from Bob Adelman, one of the most notable photographers of this movement. His work has been featured in Time, Newsweek, and the Associated Press. It is authored by the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC), an organization in which Dr. King served as the first president.

About the Author

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) is an African-American civil rights organization. SCLC was closely associated with its first president, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. The SCLC had a large role in the American Civil Rights Movement. SCLC is a now a nation-wide organization made up of chapters and affiliates with programs that affect the lives of all Americans: north, south, east and west. Its sphere of influence and interests has become international in scope because the human rights movement transcends national boundaries. Bob Adelman (Miami, FL) is an American photographer known for his images of the African-American Civil Rights Movement. Raised on Long Island, New York, he earned his B.A. at Rutgers University, Law Studies from Harvard University, and M.A. in Philosophy from Columbia University. Adelman used his background as a graduate student in Applied Aesthetics from Columbia University to forge close ties with leading figures of art and literature, including Andy Warhol and Samuel Beckett. After studying photography for several years under the tutelage of famed Harper’s Bazaar art director Alexey Brodovitch, Adelman volunteered as a photographer for the Congress of Racial Equality in the early 1960s, a position that granted him access to Civil Rights Movement’s key leaders, including Malcolm X, Martin Luther King, Jr., and James Baldwin. Adelman currently resides in Miami Beach. His work is represented by the Howard Greenberg Gallery.

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50 Stories from My Life

S R Nathan is one of Singapore’s most distinguished public servants. Born into poverty, he survived family tragedy, destitution and the Japanese occupation. After getting a university diploma as an adult, he worked his way through the civil service ranks to become successively a mediator in trade union disputes, a foreign affairs expert, a manager of a media company, a diplomat and a two-term president of Singapore. He has been an eyewitness to Singapore’s history before and after independence, with an insider’s view of many key events at home and abroad. It is easy for the younger generations of Singaporeans to assume that the good fortune they now enjoy was easily won. For them, and for anyone interested in Singapore and its history, Mr Nathan has selected 50 episodes from his personal and official life, which offer insights from which the up-and-coming generation will benefit.

About the Author

Mr S R Nathan, former president of Singapore, completed his second and last term of office at the end of August 2011. Before he was elected president in 1999, he had an illustrious career in the Singapore Public Service, overseeing various portfolios in his 50-year career and spanning the fields of labour welfare and foreign relations. He began his service as a medical social worker, followed by six years as a seaman s welfare officer and eventually rose to helm the Labour Research Unit as director in January 1964, when he also helped to establish the National Trades Union Congress (NTUC). Following Singapore s independence in 1965, he served in the nascent Ministry of Foreign Affairs as assistant secretary, before progressing to Home Affairs and then to Defence. He returned to the Foreign Ministry in 1979 as first permanent secretary for almost three years before retiring officially from the civil service. Subsequently Mr Nathan served a stint as executive chairman of The Straits Times Press before becoming Singapore s high commissioner to Malaysia (1988 90) and ambassador to the US (1990 6). On his return, he established the Institute of Defence and Strategic Studies (now the S. Rajaratnam School of International Studies, RSIS) at the Nanyang Technological University (NTU), and served there until 1999, when he was elected president of Singapore. Mr Nathan is now a Distinguished Senior Fellow at the Singapore Management University (SMU), as well as at the Institute of South East Asian Studies (ISEAS) of the National University of Singapore (NUS) and at NTU. He is also chairman of the CapitaLand Hope Foundation. He has authored three books. The first, Why Am I Here, details his work assisting seafarers, and the second, Winning Against The Odds, describes the struggles in establishing the NTUC. Mr Nathan has just recently published his personal memoirs entitled An Unexpected Journey: Path to the Presidency, in September 2011.”

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A Body, Undone: Living On After Great Pain

In the early evening on October 1, 2003, Christina Crosby was three miles into a seventeen mile bicycle ride, intent on reaching her goal of 1,000 miles for the riding season. She was a respected senior professor of English who had celebrated her fiftieth birthday a month before. As she crested a hill, she caught a branch in the spokes of her bicycle, which instantly pitched her to the pavement. Her chin took the full force of the blow, and her head snapped back. In that instant, she was paralyzed. In A Body, Undone, Crosby puts into words a broken body that seems beyond the reach of language and understanding. She writes about a body shot through with neurological pain, disoriented in time and space, incapacitated by paralysis and deadened sensation. To address this foreign body, she calls upon the readerly pleasures of narrative, critical feminist and queer thinking, and the concentrated language of lyric poetry. Working with these resources, she recalls her 1950s tomboy ways in small-town, rural Pennsylvania, and records growing into the 1970s through radical feminism and the affirmations of gay liberation. Deeply unsentimental, Crosby communicates in unflinching prose the experience of “diving into the wreck” of her body to acknowledge grief, and loss, but also to recognize the beauty, fragility, and dependencies of all human bodies. A memoir that is a meditation on disability, metaphor, gender, sex, and love, A Body, Undone is a compelling account of living on, as Crosby rebuilds her body and fashions a life through writing, memory, and desire.

About the Author

Christina Crosby is a Professor of English and Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Wesleyan University. She is the author of The Ends of History: Victorians and the ‘Woman Question’ (1991) and has published essays and reviews in Victorian Studies, PMLA, College English, and elsewhere.

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A Hakka Woman’s Singapore Stories

Dr Lee Wei Ling, scion of Singapore’s first family, writes about her life as a daughter, doctor and diehard Singaporean. This book addresses a range of matters affecting Singaporeans in a personal way. It reflects her personality, profession, relationships, passions and perspective of life, Singapore and the world, and her loved ones. The chapters are grouped thematically and are capped by an epilogue of six articles which encapsulate the two events that had a major impact on the writer, and resonated deeply with Singaporeans: the passing of her parents.

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Alan Turing’s Systems of Logic: The Princeton Thesis

Between inventing the concept of a universal computer in 1936 and breaking the German Enigma code during World War II, Alan Turing (1912-1954), the British founder of computer science and artificial intelligence, came to Princeton University to study mathematical logic. Some of the greatest logicians in the world–including Alonzo Church, Kurt Godel, John von Neumann, and Stephen Kleene–were at Princeton in the 1930s, and they were working on ideas that would lay the groundwork for what would become known as computer science. This book presents a facsimile of the original typescript of Turing’s fascinating and influential 1938 Princeton PhD thesis, one of the key documents in the history of mathematics and computer science. The book also features essays by Andrew Appel and Solomon Feferman that explain the still-unfolding significance of the ideas Turing developed at Princeton. A work of philosophy as well as mathematics, Turing’s thesis envisions a practical goal–a logical system to formalize mathematical proofs so they can be checked mechanically. If every step of a theorem could be verified mechanically, the burden on intuition would be limited to the axioms. Turing’s point, as Appel writes, is that “mathematical reasoning can be done, and should be done, in mechanizable formal logic.” Turing’s vision of “constructive systems of logic for practical use” has become reality: in the twenty-first century, automated “formal methods” are now routine. Presented here in its original form, this fascinating thesis is one of the key documents in the history of mathematics and computer science.

About the Author

Andrew W. Appel is the Eugene Higgins Professor and Chairman of the Department of Computer Science at Princeton University.

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An Unexpected Journey: Path to the Presidency

Here Singapore’s President S.R. Nathan tells his own story, taking the reader back with him to his childhood, to modest beginnings and life as a runaway in Singapore and Malaya, and then the experience of renewed hope during the Japanese occupation. After a belated and limited university education, as well as a short spell as a social worker dealing with seafarers, he witnessed from inside the Labour Reserch Unit the birth of Singapore’s modern trade union movement. Shortly after Singapore achieved full independence, he joined the staff of the newly established Ministry of Foreign Affairs, retiring – as he thought – as Permanent Secretary. However, he did not retire. After being asked to run the Straits Times newspaper for a time, he served as High Commissioner in Malaysia and Ambassador in the United States. Few people have packed so much into a life. And then, at an age when most people are well beyond the end of their working lives, he was elected President of Singapore, in which role he has won the hearts of many people in Singapore and abroad.

About the Author

S.R. Nathan (1924-) was elected to the office of President of Singapore September 1st, 1999.

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At Home with Jane Austen

Explore the homes which shaped our best-loved novelist. Jane Austen is among the most widely read and beloved authors in English literature. Her novels vividly depict the society and world in which she lived with humour and sharp social commentary. Jane’s own life and emotional experiences, deeply influenced by where she lived in southern England and her travels to other parts of the country, are reflected in her works and in the importance of house and home to her characters. With newly commissioned photographs of Chawton House and Steventon Church and village in Hampshire, and a wide range of contemporary illustration, Kim Wilson explores the homes which shaped this best-loved novelist, bringing to life the domestic settings of her great works.

About the Author

KIM WILSON is a writer, editor, and gardener who lives in Wisconsin and is a longtime member of the Jane Austen Society of North America. She is the author of Tea with Jane Austen, described by Booklist as ‘perfect for Austen-reading book clubs’ and In the Garden with Jane Austen, described by House and Garden as ‘a charming book, full of interesting snippets and comment’.

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British Cotton Textiles: Maturity and Decline

This book examines the decline of the cotton textiles industry, which defined Britain as an industrial nation, from its peak in the late nineteenth century to the state of the industry at the end of the twentieth century. Focusing on the owners and managers of cotton businesses, the authors examine how they mobilised financial resources; their attitudes to industry structure and technology; and their responses to the challenges posed by global markets. The origins of the problems which forced the industry into decline are not found in any apparent loss of competitiveness during the long nineteenth century but rather in the disastrous reflotation after the First World War. As a consequence of these speculations, rationalisation and restructuring became more difficult at the time when they were most needed, and government intervention led to a series of partial solutions to what became a process of protracted decline. In the post-1945 period, the authors show how government policy encouraged capital withdrawal rather than encouraging the investment needed for restructuring. The examples of corporate success since the Second World War – such as David Alliance and his Viyella Group – exploited government policy, access to capital markets, and closer relationships with retailers, but were ultimately unable to respond effectively to international competition and the challenges of globalisation. The chapters in this book were originally published in Business History and Accounting, Business and Financial History.

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Burma Headhunters

This is an old writing about the Wa tribal people. During the period of this report written by Harold Mason Young, he was associated less frequently and gained knowledge of their ways from direct contact as well as from the Lahu people. His perspective of the Wa tribal people is unique, especially as it was in the early part of 1900 when the Wa were still practicing their traditional way. It offers some interesting information on the Wa, of which few foreigners ever saw during this period of history. There are likely studiers of ethnic tribal people that will find some of the book useful and maybe even entertaining.

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Chasing Rainbows

Beautiful and elusive, rainbows have long been held as a symbol of hopes and dreams. Everyone yearns to chase their own rainbows, reaching out as far as their horizons can stretch. In the course of such pursuits, the wheels of fortune and fate turn mysteriously …When Lau Chia Bing aspired to be a martial arts scholar serving the Qing Dynasty court, he had no idea if it would lead to fulfillment or disappointment.
Fueled by a burning passion for his motherland, Chu Chi Chok did not expect the fervent pursuit of his ideals to lead him to the love of his life, and also cost him the greatest loss he could ever bear. Lau Lee Shiam hungered for education, but never dreamt that her quest for knowledge would bring her much joy and hope, as well as much pain and tragedy later in life. Chasing Rainbows spans more than a century, tracing the adventures – and misadventures – of four generations of a Chinese family that had sunk roots in Singapore and Malaya. Told with heartfelt earnest, the true, compelling accounts of this extraordinary family and their flaming desires is an inspiring story about chasing rainbows that are close to their hearts. Chasing Rainbows is a publication of Straits Times Press.
First published in Chinese as Zhui Hong (追虹).
About the author
Choo Lian Liang embarked on a career in television in 1972, beginning as a producer at the former Radio and Television Singapore (RTS). For many years, she was responsible for well-known Chinese current affairs programmes such as Focus 30, Tuesday Report and other documentary features. From 1997 to 2000, she served as the Chief Representative for Television Corporation of Singapore (TCS) in China. Choo Lian Liang has also written short literary pieces for the former Nanyang Siang Pau and Lianhe Zaobao. She has published two collections of her columns entitled Thoughts of a Television Producer (1993) and Three Years in Beijing (2000). In 2010, she published Zhui Hong (追虹), a family history spanning more than a hundred years in Chinese. In the same year, Zhui Hong was also published in Hong Kong and China.
About the Translator
Sim Ann started her career in 1998 as an Assistant Director for Finance Policy and Planning at the Ministry of Health. From 2000 to 2003, she worked at the Ministry of Home Affairs as an Assistant Director for Implementation Planning, before moving to the Ministry of Trade and Industry, where she was Deputy Director for Trade until 2006. Between 2007 and 2009, she was the Regional Director (East China) for IE Singapore and in 2009, she became the Director for the National Population Secretariat until she left the Civil Service in 2011.
Sim Ann first stepped into the political arena in the 2011 General Elections when she contested in the Holland-Bukit Timah GRC as one of the four member PAP team led by incumbent Minister for Environment and Water Resources, Dr Vivian Balakrishnan. The other PAP members are Christopher de Souza and Liang Eng Hwa. She is currently the MP for the Holland-Bukit Timah GRC
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Dallas Cowboys in the Hall of Fame: Their Remarkable Journeys to Canton

Troy Aikman. Emmitt Smith. Michael Irvin. Tom Landry. The names are easily recognizable as Dallas Cowboys, and their legacies are on display in the Pro Football Hall of Fame. They are among the twenty-two Cowboys in the Hall, and all of their stories are finally brought together in this book. Cowboy fans will enjoy reading about their favorite players’ journeys to the Hall of Fame, from Troy Aikman’s childhood dreams of playing professional baseball to Rayfield Wright’s long wait to be elected into the Hall. Each chapter includes the player’s bio, his career statistics, highlights, and more.

About the Author

David Thomas is author/coauthor of eleven books, including New York Times bestsellers Wrestling for My Life with Shawn Michaels and Foxcatcher with Mark Schultz. The lifelong Texan spent almost three decades in sports journalism, including more than twenty years combined at the Fort Worth Star-Telegram and The Dallas Morning News. His writing was honored nationally by the Associated Press Sports Editors and he received the McClatchy Company President’s Award for excellence in journalism.

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Darkness in Paradise: Memories of Onno VanDemmeltraadt from His Youth in Indonesia during WWII

Onno VanDemmeltraadt was born in the Dutch East Indies and was six years old when the Japanese occupation of World War II began. In Darkness in Paradise, author Gloria VanDemmeltraadt–Onno’s wife–tells her husband’s story from the unique view of a young boy in the midst of darkness in his paradise. In this memoir, Gloria has captured both the horrors and humor of her husband’s early life in war-ravaged Indonesia. This recollection shares memories of fierce Japanese soldiers bursting into his family’s home, and later having one of them teach him to fish. Visions, such as Onno’s family running down the street with mattresses covering their heads as bullets fly by them, are stark. The stories tell the pains of war, but are filled with hope. Inspiring both tears and laughter throughout, Darkness in Paradise reveals layers of human compassion during the awful times of World War II. Praise for Darkness in Paradise “What a wonderful first-person read. Onno has such a magnificent recall of facts I felt like I was there with him during many of his adventures. Told from a child’s point of view, it’s about a country affected by WWII, and the subsequent Japanese occupation of Indonesia. You get a sense of the diverse cultures of Indonesia, both the native inhabitants as well as the mix of people from Holland who immigrated there. The many transitions of place, culture, and age are all brought to life.” –Connie Anderson, Author, When Polio Came Home

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Dreams from My Father: A Story of Race and Inheritance

In this lyrical, unsentimental, and compelling memoir, the son of a black African father and a white American mother searches for a workable meaning to his life as a black American. It begins in New York, where Barack Obama learns that his father–a figure he knows more as a myth than as a man–has been killed in a car accident. This sudden death inspires an emotional odyssey–first to a small town in Kansas, from which he retraces the migration of his mother’s family to Hawaii, and then to Kenya, where he meets the African side of his family, confronts the bitter truth of his father’s life, and at last reconciles his divided inheritance. Pictured in lefthand photograph on cover: Habiba Akumu Hussein and Barack Obama, Sr. (President Obama’s paternal grandmother and his father as a young boy). Pictured in righthand photograph on cover: Stanley Dunham and Ann Dunham (President Obama’s maternal grandfather and his mother as a young girl).

About the Author

BARACK OBAMA was elected President of the United States on November 4, 2008. He is also the author of the “New York Times” bestseller “The Audacity of Hope: Thoughts on Reclaiming the American Dream.”

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Elephant Company: The Inspiring Story of an Unlikely Hero and the Animals Who Helped Him Save Lives in World War II

“NEW YORK TIMES “BESTSELLER The remarkable story of James Howard “Billy” Williams, whose uncanny rapport with the world’s largest land animals transformed him from a carefree young man into the charismatic war hero known as Elephant Bill Billy Williams came to colonial Burma in 1920, fresh from service in World War I, to a job as a “forest man” for a British teak company. Mesmerized by the intelligence, character, and even humor of the great animals who hauled logs through the remote jungles, he became a gifted “elephant wallah.” Increasingly skilled at treating their illnesses and injuries, he also championed more humane treatment for them, even establishing an elephant “school” and “hospital.” In return, he said, the elephants made him a better man. The friendship of one magnificent tusker in particular, Bandoola, would be revelatory. In “Elephant Company, “Vicki Constantine Croke chronicles Williams’s growing love for elephants as the animals provide him lessons in courage, trust, and gratitude. But “Elephant Company” is also a tale of war and daring. When Imperial Japanese forces invaded Burma in 1942, Williams joined the elite Force 136, the British dirty tricks department, operating behind enemy lines. His war elephants would carry supplies, build bridges, and transport the sick and elderly over treacherous mountain terrain. Now well versed in the ways of the jungle, an older, wiser Williams even added to his stable by smuggling more elephants out of Japanese-held territory. As the occupying authorities put a price on his head, Williams and his elephants faced his most perilous test. In a Hollywood-worthy climax, Elephant Company, cornered by the enemy, attempted a desperate escape: a risky trek over the mountainous border to India, with a bedraggled group of refugees in tow. Elephant Bill’s exploits would earn him top military honors and the praise of famed Field Marshal Sir William Slim. Part biography, part war epic, and part wildlife adventure, “Elephant Company” is an inspirational narrative that illuminates a little-known chapter in the annals of wartime heroism. Praise for “Elephant Company” “I have to confess–my love of elephants made me apprehensive to review a book about their role in World War II. But as soon as I began to read “Elephant Company, “I realized that not only was my heart safe, but that this book is about far more than just the war, or even elephants. This is the story of friendship, loyalty and breathtaking bravery that transcends species. . . . [Vicki] Croke is a natural storyteller. . . . “Elephant Company” is nothing less than a sweeping tale, masterfully written.”–Sara Gruen, “The New York Times Book Review” “”Elephant Company” is as powerful and big-hearted as the animals of its title. Billy Williams is an extraordinary character, a real-life reverse Tarzan raised in civilization who finds wisdom and his true self living among jungle beasts. Vicki Constantine Croke delivers an exciting tale of this elephant-whisperer-cum-war-hero, while beautifully reminding us of the enduring bonds between animals and humans.”–Mitchell Zuckoff, author of “Lost in Shangri-La “and” Frozen in Time” “The true-life heroics of Elephant Company during World War II highlight how animals and humans together can achieve extraordinary things. Croke’s evocative writing and deep understanding of the animal-human bond bring vividly to life Elephant Bill’s great passion and almost mystical connection with his magnificent beasts. This is a wonderful read.”–Elizabeth Letts, author of “The Eighty-Dollar Champion”

About the Author

Vicki Constantine Croke has been chronicling animal life for more than two decades–tracking polar bears, Tasmanian devils, and Madagascar’s top predator, the fossa. She now covers animal issues for WBUR-FM, Boston’s NPR news station, on air (“Here and Now”) and on WBUR’s The Wild Life online. Her work there earned a 2013 regional Edward R. Murrow Award. She is the author of “The Lady and the Panda: The True Adventures of the First American Explorer to Bring Back China’s Most Exotic Animal, “and” The Modern Ark: The Story of Zoos–Past, Present and Future. “Croke has worked on nature documentaries for Disney and for the A&E channel and anchored “The Secret Life of Animals” on NECN-TV. She also wrote “The Boston Globe”‘s “Animal Beat” column for thirteen years, and has contributed to “The New York Times, The Washington Post, The London Sunday Telegraph, Time, Popular Science, O: The Oprah Magazine, Gourmet, National Wildlife, ” and “Discover” magazine, among others. She lives in the Boston area.

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Eureka: How Invention Happens

Tracing the long pre-history of five twentieth-century inventions which have transformed our lives, Gavin Weightman reveals a fantastic cast of scientists and inspired amateurs whose ingenuity has given us the airplane, television, bar code, personal computer, and mobile phone. Not one of these inventions can be attributed to a lone genius who experiences a moment of inspiration. Nearly all innovations exist in the imagination before they are finally made to work by the hard graft of inventors who draw on the discoveries of others. While the discoveries of scientists have provided vital knowledge which has made innovation possible, it is a revelation of Weightman’s study that it is more often than not the amateur who enjoys the “eureka moment” when an invention works for the first time. Filled with fascinating stories of struggle, rivalry, and the ingenuity of both famous inventors and hundreds of forgotten people, Weightman’s captivating work is a triumph of storytelling that offers a fresh take on the making of our modern world.

About the Author

Gavin Weightman is a journalist, historian, and former documentary filmmaker. He has published more than twenty books, including The Frozen Water Trade: A True Story and Children of the Light: How Electricity Changed Britain Forever. He lives in London.

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Franz Kafka: The Poet of Shame and Guilt (Jewish Lives)

A highly original and engaging appraisal of Kafka’s life, work, legacy, and thought Franz Kafka was the poet of his own disorder. Throughout his life he struggled with a pervasive sense of shame and guilt that left traces in his daily existence-in his many letters, in his extensive diaries, and especially in his fiction. This stimulating book investigates some of the sources of Kafka’s personal anguish and its complex reflections in his imaginary world. In his query, Saul Friedlander probes major aspects of Kafka’s life (family, Judaism, love and sex, writing, illness, and despair) that until now have been skewed by posthumous censorship. Contrary to Kafka’s dying request that all his papers be burned, Max Brod, Kafka’s closest friend and literary executor, edited and published the author’s novels and other works soon after his death in 1924. Friedlander shows that, when reinserted in Kafka’s letters and diaries, deleted segments lift the mask of “sainthood” frequently attached to the writer and thus restore previously hidden aspects of his individuality.

About the Author

Saul Friedlander is a renowned historian of the Holocaust and a Pulitzer Prize-winning author. He is Distinguished Emeritus Professor of History and Club 39 Endowed Chair in Holocaust Studies at UCLA. He lives in Los Angeles, CA.

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Frederick Douglass: A Slave Biography

Antislavery campaigner, author, diplomat and political statesmen, Frederick Douglass was one of the greatest men of his age. A former slave himself, Frederick fought publicly against slavery and was an inspiration in the fight for social and political change. Written by Amanda Mitchison, find out about this life-long battle to fight for equality. * Sapphire/Band 16 books offer longer reads to develop children’s sustained engagement with texts and are more complex syntactically. * Text type: A biography * Curriculum links: History, Citizenship

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Going Solo: The Extraordinary Rise and Surprising Appeal of Living Alone

Going Solo is an examination of the most significant demographic shift since the Baby Boom — the sharp increase in the number of people who live alone. In 1950, only 22 percent of American adults were single. Today, more than 50 percent of American adults are single and 31 million — roughly one out of every seven adults — live alone. In Going Solo, renowned sociologist and author Eric Klinenberg proves that these numbers are more than just a passing trend. They’re actually evidence of the biggest demographic shift since the Baby Boom. We are crafting new ways of living. Klinenberg explores the seismic impact “going solo” is having on culture, business, and politics. Though conventional wisdom tells us that living by oneself leads to loneliness and isolation, the facts tell us that most solo dwellers are deeply engaged in social and civic life. Compared with their married counterparts, they are more likely to eat out and exercise, go to art and music

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Handsome Ransom Jackson: Accidental Big Leaguer

“Handsome Ransom” Jackson was an all-star third baseman in the 1950s. He was in Chicago in 1953 when Ernie Banks became the first African American to play for the Cubs. He was in Brooklyn in 1956, the year Jackie Robinson retired and Don Larsen of the New York Yankees threw a perfect game in the World Series. In 1957, Jackson was the last Brooklyn player to hit a home run before the team was moved to L.A. This autobiographical account, told by Ransom Jackson Jr. to Gaylon H. White, shares all these stories and more, spanning from Jackson’s youth to his college years playing both football and baseball and on through his retirement from the big leagues.

About the Author

Ransom Jackson Jr. was a professional baseball player for twelve years, ten in the majors. He played for the Chicago Cubs (1950-55 and 1959), the Dodgers in Brooklyn (1956-57) and Los Angeles (1958), and the Cleveland Indians (1958-59). He played in two Major League Baseball All-Star games and the 1956 World Series. Jackson also played three years of college football at Texas Christian University and the University of Texas, during which he competed in two Cotton Bowl Classics. Gaylon H. White was a sportswriter for the Denver Post, Arizona Republic and Oklahoma Journal before working in the corporate world for nearly forty years. He is the author of The Bilko Athletic Club: The Story of the 1956 Los Angeles Angels (Rowman & Littlefield, 2014), called “one of the best sports books of 2014” by the Chicago Daily Herald.

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Hard Truths to Keep Singapore Going

Why is Lee so hard on his political opponents? Could the PAP ever lose its grip on power? Are the younger leaders up to the mark? Will growing religiosity change Singapore for the better of worse? How will rising giants China and India affect Singapore’s fortunes? Why is rich Singapore so parsimonious when spending on the poor and disadvantaged? Why the drive to attract immigrants despite Singaporeans’ discomfiture? Lee, fielding these and many other questions in the book and on DVD, is combative, thought-provoking and controversial. Lee has stayed in the public eye for 60 years – as the revolutionary leader who steered Singapore to independence, as the Prime Minister who transformed the Republic into a First World country, and as Minister Mentor, the elder statesman. Based on 32 hours of interviews, this book and DVD pick up where his memoirs of 1999 and 2000 left off. His views are articulated forcefully, with forays into history to buttress his point. To him, Singapore is a miracle that could disappear if not for exceptional leadership and safeguards. Here is Lee at 87, an unrepentant believer in strong government, in genes, and in the view that economics trumps freedoms. Unvarnished Lee This book presents the politically incorrect Lee, often impatient and dismissive of those who criticise his worldview. He is not one for regrets. He does not recant. But there are moments when he looks back and thinks he could have done things differently or been more accommodating. Readers will gain insight into Lee’s mind as he ruminates, argues, thinks aloud and rebuts.

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