Showing 1–20 of 428 results

Out of stock

1177 B.C.: The Year Civilization Collapsed

In 1177 B.C., marauding groups known only as the “Sea Peoples” invaded Egypt. The pharaoh’s army and navy managed to defeat them, but the victory so weakened Egypt that it soon slid into decline, as did most of the surrounding civilizations. After centuries of brilliance, the civilized world of the Bronze Age came to an abrupt and cataclysmic end. Kingdoms fell like dominoes over the course of just a few decades. No more Minoans or Mycenaeans. No more Trojans, Hittites, or Babylonians. The thriving economy and cultures of the late second millennium B.C., which had stretched from Greece to Egypt and Mesopotamia, suddenly ceased to exist, along with writing systems, technology, and monumental architecture. But the Sea Peoples alone could not have caused such widespread breakdown. How did it happen? In this major new account of the causes of this “First Dark Ages,” Eric Cline tells the gripping story of how the end was brought about by multiple interconnected failures, ranging from invasion and revolt to earthquakes, drought, and the cutting of international trade routes. Bringing to life the vibrant multicultural world of these great civilizations, he draws a sweeping panorama of the empires and globalized peoples of the Late Bronze Age and shows that it was their very interdependence that hastened their dramatic collapse and ushered in a dark age that lasted centuries. A compelling combination of narrative and the latest scholarship, 1177 B.C. sheds new light on the complex ties that gave rise to, and ultimately destroyed, the flourishing civilizations of the Late Bronze Age-and that set the stage for the emergence of classical Greece.

About the Author

Eric H. Cline is professor of classics and anthropology and director of the Capitol Archaeological Institute at George Washington University. An active archaeologist, he has excavated and surveyed in Greece, Crete, Cyprus, Egypt, Israel, and Jordan. His many books include “From Eden to Exile: Unraveling the Mysteries of the Bible” and “The Trojan War: A Very Short Introduction”.

Out of stock
Out of stock

50 Years of Indian Community in Singapore (World Scientific Series on Singapore’s 50 Years of Nation-Building)

From Tamils to Malayalees to Bengalis to Punjabis, the diverse Indian community in Singapore has played a large part in building the country. To understand the Indian community, one has to understand certain basic facts about them. First is their love for culture which transcends religious and linguistic differences. Some of the best classical Hindustani singers are Muslims. The best Malayalam singer of Hindu religious songs is a Christian. Second is their love of debates. Argument is part of Indian tradition because of the belief that truth can only be arrived at only by vigorous debate. The third characteristic is the community’s respect for education. Hindus, who form the largest group among the Indians, perhaps have the only surviving “Goddess of Knowledge” in their pantheon of deities. The fourth characteristic of the Indians is their religiocity: they take their religious duties and seriously and perform them regularly. This celebratory volume highlights the progress, the contributions and the challenges of the community for the past 50 years since Singapore’s independence in 1965. While the community is now in a secure and happy position, there are challenges going forward. The next phase of growth will be knowledge based, and the focus will be on education and training, particularly training in the latest technology.

Out of stock
Out of stock

50 Years of Transportation in Singapore: Achievements and Challenges

This unique volume presents the achievements of the land, sea and air transport industry of Singapore in the last 50 years after Singapore gained its independence in 1965. It provides a comprehensive overview of Singapore’s progress in transportation from a typical third world system in the 1960s to one that is currently in the top league globally in all aspects of passenger and freight transportation. Singapore’s successes in land transport planning, urban traffic management, and public transport systems provide valuable experience for major cities worldwide. The emergence of the Singapore Port as the most efficient container port in the world is another success story that inspires both established and up-and-coming port operators alike. The ambitious goal of Singapore to develop itself into a maritime knowledge hub of the future is a bold and exciting undertaking catching worldwide attention. In air transport, Singapore is well known for its efficiency as a major regional hub. This book examines in detail the important milestones and background developments that have led to the highly advanced state of transportation systems in the land, sea and air transport of Singapore today. Each chapter is written by professionals who are themselves part of the success stories presented. The chapter authors are specially invited to provide a professional account of the topics of their expertise. The authors have been able to draw on extensive amounts of published and unpublished documents and reports to present a comprehensive picture for the subject of interest in each chapter. As a whole, the book offers a hollistic and informative professional reference book on the major happenings and achievements of Singapore in the transportation sector.

Out of stock
Out of stock

A Beveridge Reader

The editors have chosen substantial extracts to illustrate the major themes and ideas in Beveridge’s writing over a period of more than four decades, ranging from his book Unemployment, published in 1909, to the Beveridge Report of 1942 and beyond. Sections cover his social philosophy; the crucial role he attributed to social insurance as a technique of welfare; his relation to economics; and the stress he placed on voluntary action in a free society. Each theme is introduced by a full editorial commentary which explains its place in Beveridge’s thought, as well as outlining his position and offering critical guidance to the reader. The return of mass unemployment and continuing debate on the role of the welfare state has revived interest in Beveridge’s work and this reader brings his ideas.

Out of stock
Out of stock

A Bun in the Oven: How the Food and Birth Movements Resist Industrialization

There are people dedicated to improving the way we eat, and people dedicated to improving the way we give birth. A Bun in the Oven is the first comparison of these two social movements. The food movement has seemingly exploded, but little has changed in the diet of most Americans. And while there’s talk of improving the childbirth experience, most births happen in large hospitals, about a third result in C-sections, and the US does not fare well in infant or maternal outcomes. In A Bun in the Oven Barbara Katz Rothman traces the food and the birth movements through three major phases over the course of the 20th century in the United States: from the early 20th century era of scientific management; through to the consumerism of Post World War II with its ‘turn to the French’ in making things gracious; to the late 20th century counter-culture midwives and counter-cuisine cooks. The book explores the tension throughout all of these eras between the industrial demands of mass-management and profit-making, and the social movements-composed largely of women coming together from very different feminist sensibilities-which are working to expose the harmful consequences of industrialization, and make birth and food both meaningful and healthy. Katz Rothman, an internationally recognized sociologist named ‘midwife to the movement’ by the Midwives Alliance of North America, turns her attention to the lessons to be learned from the food movement, and the parallel forces shaping both of these consumer-based social movements. In both movements, issues of the natural, the authentic, and the importance of ‘meaningful’ and ‘personal’ experiences get balanced against discussions of what is sensible, convenient and safe. And both movements operate in a context of commercial and corporate interests, which places profit and efficiency above individual experiences and outcomes. A Bun in the Oven brings new insight into the relationship between our most intimate, personal experiences, the industries that control them, and the social movements that resist the industrialization of life and seek to birth change.

About the Author

Barbara Katz Rothman is Professor of Sociology, Public Health and Women’s Studies at the City University of New York. Her previous books include In Labor, The Tentative Pregnancy, Recreating Motherhood, The Book of Life and, with Wendy Simonds, Laboring On.

Out of stock
Out of stock

A Feast for the Senses: Art and Experience in Medieval Europe

The late medieval world was marked by a culture of refinement and sophistication. The period’s media of choice-paintings, manuscripts, prints, tapestries, embroideries, ivory sculpture, metalwork, and enamels-speak volumes about the pleasures of sensory engagement. Art objects were touched, smelled, and heard, as well as seen. This sumptuous new book brings together sacred and secular art to reveal the shared intellectual culture that governed perception in Europe in the 13th through the 16th centuries. A focused exploration of the performative and multifaceted nature of medieval art underscores its direct appeal to the senses, revealing the rich experiential world that informed its interpretation. Nine essays explore these themes through representations of religious practices, royal rituals, feasts and celebrations, music, and literature. Beautifully designed and produced, A Feast for the Senses contributes significantly to an emerging field in the history of art and showcases approximately 130 objects, each accompanied by a full description, provenance, and bibliography.

About the Author

Martina Bagnoli is the director of the Estensi Gallery in Modena, Italy.

Out of stock
Out of stock

A Great Conspiracy against Our Race: Italian Immigrant Newspapers and the Construction of Whiteness in the Early 20th Century (Culture, Labor, History)

Racial history has always been the thorn in America s side, with a swath of injustices slavery, lynching, segregation, and many other ills perpetrated against black people. This very history is complicated by, and also dependent on, what constitutes a white person in this country. Many of the European immigrant groups now considered white also had to struggle with their own racial identities.In A Great Conspiracy against Our Race, Peter Vellon explores how Italian immigrants, a once undesirable and swarthy race, assimilated into dominant white culture through the influential national and radical Italian language press in New York City. Examining the press as a cultural production of the Italian immigrant community, this book investigates how this immigrant press constructed race, class, and identity from 1886 through 1920. Their frequent coverage of racially charged events of the time, as well as other topics such as capitalism and religion, reveals how these papers constructed a racial identity as Italian, American, and white. A Great Conspiracy against Our Race vividly illustrates how the immigrant press was a site where socially constructed categories of race, color, civilization, and identity were reworked, created, contested, and negotiated. Vellon also uncovers how Italian immigrants filtered societal pressures and redefined the parameters of whiteness, constructing their own identity. This work is an important contribution to not only Italian American history, but America s history of immigration and race.”

About the Author

Peter G. Vellon is Associate Professor of History at Queens College.

Out of stock

A History of Asia 7th Global Edition

$50.00

Charts the deep, diverse history of the largest continent A History of Asia is the only text to cover the area known as “monsoon Asia”–India, China, Korea, Japan, and Southeast Asia–from the earliest times to the present. Written by leading scholar Rhoads Murphey, the book uses an engaging, lively tone to chronicle the complex political, social, intellectual, and economic histories of this area. Popular because of its scope and coverage, as well as its illustrations, maps, and many boxed primary sources, the new edition of A History of Asia continues as a leader in its field.

Out of stock

A History of Classical Malay Literature

This is a detailed, narrative-based history of Classical Malay Literature. It covers a wide range of Malay texts, including folk literature; the influence of the Indian epics and shadow theatre literature; Panji tales; the transition from Hindu to Muslim literary models; Muslim literature; framed tales; theological literature; historical literature; legal codes; and the dominant forms of poetry, the pantun and syair.

Out of stock
Out of stock

A History of East Asia: From the Origins of Civilization to the Twenty-First Century 1st Edition

Charles Holcombe begins this extraordinarily ambitious book by asking the question ‘What is East Asia?’ In the modern age, many of the features that made the region – now defined as including China, Japan, and Korea – distinct have been submerged by the effects of revolution, politics or globalization. Yet, as an ancient civilization, the region had both an historical and cultural coherence. It shared a Confucian heritage, some common approaches to Buddhism, a writing system that is deeply imbued with ideas and meaning, and many political and institutional traditions. This shared past and the interconnections among three distinct, yet related societies are at the heart of this book, which traces the story of East Asia from the dawn of history to the twenty-first century. Charles Holcombe is an experienced guide who encapsulates, in a fast-moving and colorful narrative, the vicissitudes and glories of one of the greatest civilizations on earth.

About the Author

Charles Holcombe is Professor of History at the University of Northern Iowa. His publications include The Genesis of East Asia, 221 B.C.-A.D. 907 (2001) and In the Shadow of the Han: Literati Thought and Society at the Start of the Southern Dynasties (1994).

Out of stock
Out of stock

A History of Europe in the Modern World 11th International Edition

As the new title reflects, Palmer’s A History of Europe in the Modern World maintains its well-established historical authority, while focusing more specifically on Europe’s prominent role in modern global exchanges, nation building, transnational commercial systems, colonial empires, and cultural transitions. Combining concise accounts of specific nations and national differences with a wide-ranging, comparative analysis of international events, this updated edition of a classic text carefully examines the whole modern history of Europeans and their perpetually changing societies.

About the Author

R.R. Palmer received his B.A. from the University of Chicago, his PhD from Cornell University, and honorary degrees from the Universities of Uppsala and Toulouse. He taught at Princeton University, Washington University, and Yale University before retiring in 1977. The author of Twelve Who Ruled: The Year of the Terror in the French Revolution, Age of the Democratic Revolution, The World of the French Revolution, and The Improvement of Humanity: Education and the French Revolution, Palmer has also translated such books as Georges Lefebvre’s, Coming of the French Revolution, Louis Bergeron’s, France Under Napoleon, and Jean-Paul Bertaud’s, Army of the French Revolution and has served as editor and translator of From Jacobin to Liberal: Marc-Antoine Jullian, 1775-1848. He served as President of the American Historical Association in 1970 and has been the recipient of the Bancroft Prize, 1960 and The Antonio Feltrinelli International Prize for History in Rome, 1990. A specialist in modern and contemporary European history, Joel Colton taught at Duke University from 1947 to 1989 and chaired the History Department from 1967 to 1974. He is the author of books and articles in French history and became known to generations of students and teachers as co-author with the late Robert R. Palmer of the widely read college textbook A History of the Modern World, of which the tenth edition was published in 2007. At Duke he served for several years on the executive committee and as chair of the university’s elected faculty body, the Academic Council. On extended leave from Duke, he was Director for Humanities at the Rockefeller Foundation in New York from 1974 to 1982, administering a domestic and international program in support of research and teaching in the humanities. After retiring at Duke in 1989, he continued his research and writing, participating in conferences at home and abroad, and serving as lecturer for alumni travel groups in Europe and Asia. Born August 23, 1918, and educated in New York City, to which he remained a frequent visitor, he graduated from Townsend Harris High School in 1933 and 1937 received his B.A. degree from the City College of New York, magna cum laude, with election to Phi Beta Kappa in his junior year and with honors in French and medals in Latin and French. Graduating in the Depression years, he began graduate work in history at Columbia University on a part-time basis while working full time as an assistant in the Registrar’s office at the City College. He earned an M.A. degree at Columbia in 1940. Preparing himself also for high school teaching at a time when college teaching positions were scarce, he took a master’s degree in education at the City College and taught at the Bronx High School of Science in New York as a teacher in training in 1941-42. Military service in the Second World War interrupted his graduate studies. Serving in the U.S. Armny from August 1942 to June 1946, he was commissioned in 1944 and served overseas as a military intelligence officer in Europe for eighteen months, in combat and in the occupation of Germany. In articles he wrote in 1955 and published in Army History and the Duke Alumni Magazine commemorating the 50th anniversary of the end of the war in Europe he described some of his wartime experiences, including his crossing of the Rhine at the Remagen Bridge in March 1945. After the war he resumed his graduate work, began teaching at Duke in 1947, and received his Ph.D. degree from Columbia in 1950. His first historical publication, Compulsory Labor Arbitration in France, 1936-1939 (Columbia UP, 1951), an outgrowth of his dissertation, received favorable reviews in this country and in Europe. Close to a half century later, in 1999, Osaka University in Japan published a Japanese translation of the monograph in a series described as “notable books on France and Spain in the 1930s.” His second book, more broadly focused on the 1930s, was Leon Blum: Humanist in Politics, published by Alfred A. Knopf in 1966, with a French translation following in 1968 published by Fayard, and a second edition and new forward published by Duke University Press in 1987. Alfred Knopf, who took a special interest in the book, reprinted in the then Knopf house organ, teh Borzoi Quarterly, the blooper in the British magazine Encounter that read: “The modern novel has been in a serious crisis ever since James Joyce’s monumental effort to narrate a day in the life of Leon Blum.” Leon Blum was, of course, not James Joyce’s Leopold Bloom but the gifted French intellectual and literary figure in the years before 1914 who came to head the French Socialist party after the First World War. He was France’s first Socialist, and first Jewish, premier, heading the Popular Front government in the tumultuous 1930s. In the war years he became a prisoner of Vichy and then of the Nazis but survived to head the French government again briefly before his death in 1950. Charles de Gaulle, who detested all politicians, nonetheless wrote in his memoirs in the early postwar years that if he was compelled to choose anyone as his successor he would select Leon Blum. The Colton biography won the annual North Carolina Mayflower award in 1967, an award for the best nonfiction book published that year by a resident of North Carolina. It received numerous tributes. Professor S. William Halperin, of the University of Chicago, reviewing the book in the American Historical Review in January 1967, described it as “a polished, richly tapestried, and absorbing narrative” and concluded: “I have no hesitation in predicting that it will rank high in twentieth-century historiography.” The reviewer in the American Political Science Review in June 1967 called it “solid, comprehensive, and brilliant.” Foreign Affairs included the volume in its Fifty Year Bibliography (1972) among its “outstanding books” and “works of scholarship of lasting value” published in the fifty-year period 1920-70. In later years, in April 1988, in a review of the second edition, the French journal Revue de Science Politique described it as “based on a perfect knowledge of the political history of French socialism and a classic from the time of its initial appearance.” It has received continuing recognition despite the appearance of more recent studies of Blum. Colton’s articles and book reviews have appeared in the American Historical Review, Journal of Modern History, Yale Review, New York Times Book Review, and elsewhere, and he has contributed to numerous encyclopedias and collaborative volumes. For the Time-Life Great Ages of Man series he wrote the volume entitled Twentieth Century, published in 1968, with a second edition in 1980. His collaboration with Palmer on the previously mentioned A History of the Modern World began in 1956 with the book’s second edition. Known to generations of undergraduate and graduate studiens as “Palmer and Colton,” it was published by Knopf until the closing of its college department in the early 1990s. Since 1992 it has been published by McGraw-Hill (but with Knopf continuing for several years to publish a trade edition for the general public). It traces the history of Europe and the global influence of the West, with close attention to the global context of modern history in the more recent centuries. The book has been used in over 1,000 colleges and universities in the United States and abroad and in advanced placement courses in public and private secondary schools. Over the years it has been translated in its various editions into Arabic, Persian, Swedish, Finnish, Spanish, Italian, and Chinese. A second translation into Chinese of the 10th edition appeared in 2009. In an article on textbooks in the New York Review of Books published February 6, 1987, the distinguished Princeton historian the late Lawrence Stone wrote: “A truly first-rate history textbook, like that of R. R. Palmer and Joel Colton on modern Europe, can shaped the vision of a whole generation and it is there fore very important that the textbooks used in schools and colleges be accurate, up-to-date, fair-minded, intelligent, and written in such a manner as to stimulate curiosity.” The New York Times educational supplement, Education Life, on August 2, 1987, included the book in “A List of the Best,” a description of nineteen college textbooks in all disciplines “considered classics in their fields.” Eric Hobsbawm in his The Age of Extremes: A History of the World, 1914-1991 (1995) referred his readers to its “excellent bibliographies.” Even a detective novel found occasion to mention it. Ross Thomas in The Fourth Durango (Mysterious Press, 1989, p. 250) writes that his protagonist, when interrupted by his agitated wife while he is reading in his library, “puts down his book, Palmer and Colton, the fifth edition” to listen to her recounting of the murder she has witnessed. For the two most recent editions of the textbook (9th ed., 2001; 10th ed., 2007) Lloyd Kramer, chair of the History Department at the University of North Carolina, was added as a new co-author after the aged Professor Palmer withdrew; Palmer died in 2002. The authors are now cited as Palmer, Colton, and Kramer. A new Chinese translation of the 10th edition appeared in 2009. In addition to his Guggenheim Fellowship, Mr. Colton’s research awards have included fellowships from the Rockefeller Foundation (1961-62) and the National Endowment for the Humanities (1970-71). In 1979 he was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. For distinguished achievement as an alumnus, the City College of New York awarded him a Townsend Harris Medal in 1980. He was one of twelve Phi Beta Kappa National Visiting Scholars appointed for the years 1983-84, shortly after the program was introduced, and in 1984 he was elected to the Fellows of the Phi Beta Kappa Society, an honorary organization supportive of the undergraduate society. He chaired the Phi Beta Kappa chapters at the City colleg of New York and at Duke. In 1985, at the invitation of the German Federal Republic, he participated in a special program in Bonn and Berlin designed to explore the politics, economics, and culture of contemporary Germany. In 1986 he received a Duke University Distinguished Teaching Award. In 1994 he was honored by the Western Society of French History for “exceptional contributions to the study and teaching of French history in the United States.” In 2005, the Southern Historical Association’s European History Section awarded him on the occasion of its 50th anniversary the Enno Kraehe Distinguished Service Award for his contributions to the teaching and writing of European history and for his service to the Section in its formative years. David Pinkney, president of the American Historical Association in 1980, in his presidential address cited Mr. Colton’s work as among those that had led to the Frenc h scholar Rene Remond’s observation in Le Monde: “To Americans we owe some of the best studies of contemporary France.” In a paper written for the American Historical Association’s centennial meeting in 1984, “a Century of French History in America,” R. R. Palmer observed: “American work has been especially successful on subjects which the French themselves find very sensitive to handle, for example, the biography of Leon Blum by Joel Colton and Robert Paxton’s books on the Vichy regime.” Among other professional activities Mr. Colton has served on the Board of Editors of the Journal of Modern History, French Historical Studies, and Third Republic/Troisieme Republique, and on the advisory board of Historical Abstracts. He has also served as chair or as member of committees of the American Historical Association, as vice president of the Society for French Historical Studies, and as chair of the College Entrance Examination Board’s European History Advanced Placement Committee. For many years he also worked closely on research and other projects with the International commission on the History of Social Movements and Social Structures headquarterd in Paris, several of whose projects have been published in book form. From 1985 to 1990, he was one of its three international co-presidents. Over the years Joel Colton has taught as a visiting professor at the Unversity of Wisconsin, at Makerere University in Uganda, and at Cadi-Ayyad University in Morocco, and has lectured at Tubingen University in Germany. He has resided for extended periods of time during research leaves in Paris, Geneva, and New York. For many years he was a member of the Century Association in New York and has remained a longtime member of PEN American Center. His wife, whom he married in May 1942, the late Shirley Baron Colton, a New York University alumna and editor, died in December 2003. His daughter, Valerie Woodbury, resides with her family in Durham, North Carolina. His son Kenneth Colton, is a managing director of Lazard Asset Management in New York and resides with his family in Upper Montclair, New Jersey. His five grandchildren are Emelyn Woodbury-Carroll, Marcia and Amy Woodbury, and Clare and Alex Colton. In August 2008, on the occasion of his 90th birthday, Dr. Deborah Jakubs, Director of the Duke Universities Libraries and Vice Provost for Library Affairs, announced the establishment of the Joel and Shirley Colton Fund for European History in honor of Joel and his late wife. In her announcement, Dr. Jakubs cited his “profound impact on the field of European history and on generations of graduate and undergraduate students at Duke and beyond.” The Colton Fund will help strengthen and support the existing resources at Duke for study and research in European history. Lloyd Kramer received his M.A. from Boston College and his PhD from Cornell University. He is currently Professor of History at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill where he specializes in Modern European History with an emphasis on 19th century France, Global History and cross-cultural exchanges in Modern World History. His publications include Threshold of a New World: Intellectuals and Exile Experience in Paris, 1830-1848; Lafayette in Two Worlds: Public Cultures and Personal Identities in an Age of Revolutions; Nationalism: Political Cultures in Europe and America, 1775-1865. He is co-editor of Learning History in America: Schools Cultures and Politics and has contributed “Literature, Criticism, and Historical Imagination: The Literacy Challenge of Hayden White and Dominick LaCapra” to The New Cultural History.

Out of stock
Out of stock

A History of Market Performance: From Ancient Babylonia to the Modern World

This exciting new volume examines the development of market performance from Antiquity until the dawn of the Industrial Revolution. Efficient market structures are agreed by most economists to serve as evidence of economic prosperity, and to be prerequisites for further economic growth. However, this is the first study to examine market performance as a whole, over such a large time period. Presenting a hitherto unknown and inaccessible corpus of data from ancient Babylonia, this international set of contributors are for the first time able to offer an in-depth study of market performance over a period of 2,500 years. The contributions focus on the market of staple crops, as they were crucial goods in these societies. Over this entire period, all papers provide a similar conceptual and methodological framework resting on a common definition of market performance combined with qualitative and quantitative analyses resting on new and improved price data. In this way, the book is able to combine analysis of the Babylonian period with similar work on the Roman, Early-and Late Medieval and Early Modern period. Bringing together input from assyriologists, ancient historians, economic historians and economists, this volume will be crucial reading for all those with an interest in ancient history, economic history and economics.

About the Author

Prof. Dr. R.J. van der Spek is professor of Ancient Mediterranean and West-Asiatic History at the VU University (Vrije Universiteit), Amsterdam. Prof. Dr. J.L. van Zanden is faculty professor of global economic history at Utrecht University, the Netherlands. Dr. Bas van Leeuwen is senior researcher at Warwick University, UK and postdoc researcher at the VU University Amsterdam and Utrecht University, the Netherlands.

Out of stock
Out of stock

A History of Ottoman Economic Thought: Developments Before the Nineteenth Century

The Ottoman Empire (1299-1923) existed at the crossroads of the East and the West. Neither the history of Western Asia, nor that of Eastern Europe, can be fully understood without knowledge of the history of the Ottoman Empire. The question is often raised of whether or not economic thinking can exist in a non-capitalistic society. In the Ottoman Empire, like in all other pre-capitalistic cultures, the economic sphere was an integral part of social life, and elements of Ottoman economic thought can frequently be found in amongst political, social and religious ideas. Ottoman economic thinking cannot, therefore, be analyzed in isolation; analysis of economic thinking can reveal aspects of the entire world view of the Ottomans. Based on extensive archival work, this landmark volume examines Ottoman economic thinking in the classical period using three concepts: humorism, circle of justice and household economy. Basing the research upon the writings of the Ottoman elite and bureaucrats, this book explores Ottoman economic thinking starting from its own dynamics, avoiding the temptation to seek modern economic theories and approaches in the Ottoman milieu.

About the Author

Fatih Ermis obtained his PhD from the Max Weber Center for Advanced Cultural and Social Studies, Germany.

Out of stock
Sale!

A History of Science in Society: From Philosophy to Utility 3rd Edition

$105.00 $95.00

“An update of the popular overview, A History of Science in Society traces the development of scientific thought throughout the ages. Beginning with the philosophy of the Ancient Greeks and Romans and proceeding through the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, the Enlightenment, and through to the present-day, the book presents key developments in scientific thought and theory. The new edition includes more material on non-Western science; new material on ethics, climate change, and corporate science in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries; more than 90 illustrations; updated timelines; and study questions designed to guide students.”–

Out of stock

A History of Thailand 3rd Edition

A History of Thailand offers a lively and accessible account of Thailand’s political, economic, social and cultural history. This book explores how a world of mandarin nobles and unfree peasants was transformed and examines how the monarchy managed the foundation of a new nation-state at the turn of the twentieth century. The authors capture the clashes between various groups in their attempts to take control of the nation-state in the twentieth century. They track Thailand’s economic changes through an economic boom, globalisation and the evolution of mass society. This edition sheds light on Thailand’s recent political, social and economic developments, covering the coup of 2006, the violent street politics of May 2010, and the landmark election of 2011 and its aftermath. It shows how in Thailand today, the monarchy, the military, business and new mass movements are players in a complex conflict over the nature and future of the country’s democracy.

About the Author

Chris Baker has taught Asian history at Cambridge University, and has lived in Thailand for over 30 years. He is now an independent writer, researcher and translator. Pasuk Phongpaichit is Emeritus Professor of Political Economy at Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok. She has written widely in Thai and English on the Thai economy, sex industry, corruption, illegal economy and inequality.

Out of stock
Out of stock

A Little History of Religion

In an era of hardening religious attitudes and explosive religious violence, this book offers a welcome antidote. Richard Holloway retells the entire history of religion-from the dawn of religious belief to the twenty-first century-with deepest respect and a keen commitment to accuracy. Writing for those with faith and those without, and especially for young readers, he encourages curiosity and tolerance, accentuates nuance and mystery, and calmly restores a sense of the value of faith. Ranging far beyond the major world religions of Judaism, Islam, Christianity, Buddhism, and Hinduism, Holloway also examines where religious belief comes from, the search for meaning throughout history, today’s fascinations with Scientology and creationism, religiously motivated violence, hostilities between religious people and secularists, and more. Holloway proves an empathic yet discerning guide to the enduring significance of faith and its power from ancient times to our own.

About the Author

Richard Holloway, former Bishop of Edinburgh and Primus of the Scottish Episcopal Church, is an internationally popular writer and broadcaster. His more than twenty books include the best-selling Leaving Alexandria: A Memoir of Faith and Doubt. He lives in Edinburgh, UK.

Out of stock
Out of stock

A Little History of the United States

How did a land and people of such immense diversity come together under a banner of freedom and equality to form one of the most remarkable nations in the world? Everyone from young adults to grandparents will be fascinated by the answers uncovered in James West Davidson's vividly told A Little History of the United States. In 300 fast-moving pages, Davidson guides his readers through 500 years, from the first contact between the two halves of the world to the rise of America as a superpower in an era of atomic perils and diminishing resources. In short, vivid chapters the book brings to life hundreds of individuals whose stories are part of the larger American story. Pilgrim William Bradford stumbles into an Indian deer trap on his first day in America; Harriet Tubman lets loose a pair of chickens to divert attention from escaping slaves; the toddler Andrew Carnegie, later an ambitious industrial magnate, gobbles his oatmeal with a spoon in each hand. Such stories are riveting in themselves, but they also spark larger questions to ponder about freedom, equality, and unity in the context of a nation that is, and always has been, remarkably divided and diverse.

About the Author

James West Davidson, a widely respected historian, has written on American history and the detective work that goes into it, as well as books about the outdoors. His textbooks for the middle grades, high school and college have been read by millions of students. He is also coauthor of Great Heart, cited by the National Geographic Society as one of the 100 greatest adventure books of all time. He lives in Rhinebeck, NY.

Out of stock
Out of stock

A Little History of the United States

A fast-paced, character-filled history that brings the unique American saga to life for readers of all ages.

About the Author

James West Davidson, a widely respected historian, has written on American history and the detective work that goes into it, as well as books about the outdoors. He lives in Rhinebeck, NY.

Out of stock
Out of stock

A Little History of the United States

How did a land and people of such immense diversity come together under a banner of freedom and equality to form one of the most remarkable nations in the world? Everyone from young adults to grandparents will be fascinated by the answers uncovered in James West Davidson’s vividly told A Little History of the United States. In 300 fast-moving pages, Davidson guides his readers through 500 years, from the first contact between the two halves of the world to the rise of America as a superpower in an era of atomic perils and diminishing resources. In short, vivid chapters the book brings to life hundreds of individuals whose stories are part of the larger American story. Pilgrim William Bradford stumbles into an Indian deer trap on his first day in America; Harriet Tubman lets loose a pair of chickens to divert attention from escaping slaves; the toddler Andrew Carnegie, later an ambitious industrial magnate, gobbles his oatmeal with a spoon in each hand. Such stories are riveting in themselves, but they also spark larger questions to ponder about freedom, equality, and unity in the context of a nation that is, and always has been, remarkably divided and diverse.

About the Author

James West Davidson, a widely respected historian, has written on American history and the detective work that goes into it, as well as books about the outdoors. His textbooks for the middle grades, high school and college have been read by millions of students. He is also coauthor of Great Heart, cited by the National Geographic Society as one of the 100 greatest adventure books of all time. He lives in Rhinebeck, NY.

Out of stock
Out of stock

A Meeting of Land and Sea: Nature and the Future of Martha’s Vineyard

Full of surprises, bedecked with gorgeous photographs and maps, and supported by unprecedented historical and ecological research, this book awakens a new perspective on the renowned New England island Martha’s Vineyard. David Foster explores the powerful natural and cultural forces that have shaped the storied island to arrive at a new interpretation of the land today and a well-informed guide to its conservation in the future. Two decades of research by Foster and his colleagues at the Harvard Forest encompass the native people and prehistory of the Vineyard, climate change and coastal dynamics, colonial farming and modern tourism, land planning and conservation efforts. Each of these has helped shape the island of today, and each also illuminates possibilities for future caretakers of the island’s ecology. Foster affirms that Martha’s Vineyard is far more than just a haven for celebrities, presidents, and moguls; it is a special place with a remarkable history and a population with a proud legacy of caring for the land and its future.

About the Author

David R. Foster is a faculty member in biology, Harvard University, and director of the 4,000-acre Harvard Forest. He also serves on the board of the Edey Foundation and Trustees of Reservations on Martha’s Vineyard. He divides his time between Petersham and West Tisbury, MA.

Out of stock