Showing 1–12 of 420 results

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Accounting for Oneself: Worth, Status, and the Social Order in Early Modern England

$76.74 $58.50

Worth, Status, and the Social Order in Early Modern England is a major new study of the social order in early modern England, as viewed and articulated from the bottom up. Engaging with how people from across the social spectrum placed themselves within the social order, it pieces together the language of self-description deployed by over 13,500 witnesses in English courts when answering questions designed to assess their creditworthiness. Spanning the period between 1550 and 1728, and with a broad geographical coverage, this study explores how men and women accounted for their ‘worth’ and described what they did for a living at differing points in the life-cycle. A corrective to top-down, male-centric accounts of the social order penned by elite observers, the perspective from below testifies to an intricate hierarchy based on sophisticated forms of social reckoning that were articulated throughout the social scale. A culture of appraisal was central to the competitive processes whereby people judged their own and others’ social positions. For the majority it was not land that was the yardstick of status but moveable property-the goods and chattels in people’s possession ranging from livestock to linens, tools to trading goods, tables to tubs, clothes to cushions. Such items were repositories of wealth and the security for the credit on which the bulk of early modern exchange depended. Worth, Status, and the Social Order in Early Modern England also sheds new light on women’s relationship to property, on gendered divisions of labour, and on early modern understandings of work which were linked as much to having as to getting a living. The view from below was not unchanging, but bears witness to the profound impact of widening social inequality that opened up a chasm between the middle ranks and the labouring poor between the mid-sixteenth and mid-seventeenth centuries. As a result, not only was the social hierarchy distorted beyond recognition, from the later-seventeenth century there was also a gradual yet fundamental reworking of the criteria informing the calculus of esteem. –Provided by publisher.’

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Democracy

$37.05 $32.50

The 2,500 year story of democracy: how it has survived, how it has been practised, and how it has been imagined, from ancient Greece to the twenty-first century.

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Creators, Conquerors, and Citizens: A History of Ancient Greece

$66.28 $55.20

A fascinating, accessible, and up-to-date history of the Ancient Greeks. Covering the Archaic, Classical, and Hellenistic periods, and centred around the disunity of the Greeks, their underlying cultural unity, and their eventual political unification.

Resurgent Indonesia: From Crisis to Confidence

$37.50

In 1998, wracked by financial turmoil and political upheaval, Indonesia seemed like a country on the brink of collapse. Yet it has more than turned its fortunes around.

Resurgent Indonesia – From Crisis to Confidence is the gripping inside account of Indonesia’s steep decline after the Asian financial crisis and its improbable recovery and rise in the ensuing two decades.

Giving readers a unique insight into Indonesia’s journey is former journalist Vasuki Shastry, who covered the tumultuous fall of Suharto for The Business Times and continued to work on matters related to Indonesia at the International Monetary Fund. Blending first-rate journalism with in-depth research, the book charts the country’s difficult journey from a failing state to a confident young democracy and a fast-growing economy.

[Contents] Prelude to a Crisis 1.Introduction 2.The Gathering Storm Five Stages of a Crisis 3.Denial 4.Bargaining 5.Depression 6.Anger 7.Acceptance Rise from the Ashes 8.Chindonesia 9.The Asean Way 10.Jokowi Juggernaut 11.Archipelago of Possibility

[About the Author] Vasuki Shastry was a well-known business and economics journalist in India, Singapore, and Indonesia before joining the International Monetary Fund (IMF) in 1998. His last assignment as a journalist was in Jakarta, where he was bureau chief of The Business Times between 1996 and 1998, covering the Asian financial crisis and the fall of President Suharto. He worked extensively on Indonesia during his stint at the IMF, starting as Asia Pacific spokesperson and in other roles.

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Mediating Islam: Cosmopolitan Journalisms in Muslim Southeast Asia

$35.30 $33.00

What is Islamic journalism? This study examines day-to-day journalism as practiced by Muslim professionals at five exemplary news organizations in Malaysia (Haraka, Republika and Malaysiakini) and Indonesia (Tempo and Sabili).

Janet Steele explores how these various publications observe universal principles of journalism and do so through an Islamic idiom.

Daim Zainuddin: Malaysia’s Revolutionary and Troubleshooter

$25.90

– First in-depth biography on Daim Zainuddin and an analysis of his contribution to policy – Balanced and unflinching Daim Zainuddin is one of Asia’s cleverest politicians and policy makers, as well as one of its most controversial. Twice rescuing the Malaysian economy from near collapse, he has also been instrumental in restructuring Malaysia’s economy. This fully authorised biography, including numerous interviews with Zainuddin himself and the people closest to him, reveals teh truth behind one of Asia’s most able, private and contentious politicians.

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The Japanese Occupation of Malaya and Singapore, 1941-45

For three-and-a-half bleak years during World War II, Japan occupied Malaya and Singapore, transforming a once prosperous and vibrant region into a desolate place rife with unemployment, corruption, inflation and shortages of essential supplies. As Japan’s promised Greater East Asia crumbled, malnourished residents increasingly faced a struggle to survive, with little prospect of better times ahead. Originally published in 1998, The Japanese Occupation of Malaya and Singapore is fully updated with material from newly discovered and recently translated documents and as well as new archival evidence. Kratoska’s work offers a clear depiction of wartime life under foreign occupation, and explains how the legacies of war and occupation shaped the post-war recovery in Malaya and Singapore.

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World War II Singapore

$157.00 $67.40

For forty-four months during World War II, the Japanese occupied Singapore, renaming it Syonan and setting out to drastically change life on the island. As part of the occupation, the Japanese created a research bureau, the Chosabu, to study occupied Singapore. The bureau’s detailed reports on the economy covered prices, wages, currency, rationing, living standards, food production, and industrialization. Syonan’s military and civilian administrators drew on them when formulating social and economic policies. The reports were notoriously difficult to read, and so this exceptional translation by Gregg Huff and Shinobu Majima is a true linguistic accomplishment. These records are an invaluable record of life during this tumultuous period and are especially important as the Japanese destroyed most records of their wartime administration, leaving the Chosabu reports as one of the few first-hand sources to have survived. Introductory chapters by the editors position the reports against wartime events in Singapore and examine the careers of the Chosabu authors and the places they occupy in the history of Japanese economic thought.

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Siam and World War 1: An International History

100 years ago Siam declared war on Germany. In the early morning hours of 22 July 1917, army units and gendarmerie called the roughly 200 completely unsuspecting German and Austro-Hungarian men in Bangkok out of their beds, presented them with the declaration of war and went on to arrest them. At the same time, marine units boarded the nine ocean going German ships anchored on the river, capturing what was considered by all to be the greatest prize. With these events began Siam’s 17 months at war with two European powers. The story of how these 17 months unfolded in Siam and in Europe is at the heart of this book. It is a complex tale interweaving political, diplomatic, military, cultural and social history. The book introduces adventurous and scared Thai soldiers on the battlefields of the Western Front, arrogant European politicians and diplomats convinced of their racial and cultural superiority, shrewd Thai officials beating the West at its own game of imperialism, princes rivalling over influence and power, German businessmen imprisoned by “Orientals”, Thai students caught up in world events and submarine attacks, and the King of Siam himself. Siam’s participation in World War I was the single most important international event for contemporaries in the kingdom, its symbolism unmatched by any other occurrence of the times. The book is the first-ever extensively researched study of Siam and World War I in all its facets. By combining primary sources from Thailand, Germany, France, Great Britain, and Austria, the study describes local events in a global context and explains how world events manifested themselves in the royal palaces and on the streets of Bangkok. The legacy of the events a century ago is remarkably tangible even today, and the book connects the reader with this legacy. The book is easily accessible to the non-specialist reader interested in history and political affairs, as it describes numerous colourful episodes and vignettes, and includes over 300 rare photographs and illustrations, reproduced in high-quality print. The book is published simultaneously in a Thai and an English-language version100 years ago Siam declared war on Germany. In the early morning hours of 22 July 1917, army units and gendarmerie called the roughly 200 completely unsuspecting German and Austro-Hungarian men in Bangkok out of their beds, presented them with the declaration of war and went on to arrest them. At the same time, marine units boarded the nine ocean going German ships anchored on the river, capturing what was considered by all to be the greatest prize. With these events began Siam’s 17 months at war with two European powers. The story of how these 17 months unfolded in Siam and in Europe is at the heart of this book. It is a complex tale interweaving political, diplomatic, military, cultural and social history. The book introduces adventurous and scared Thai soldiers on the battlefields of the Western Front, arrogant European politicians and diplomats convinced of their racial and cultural superiority, shrewd Thai officials beating the West at its own game of imperialism, princes rivalling over influence and power, German businessmen imprisoned by “Orientals”, Thai students caught up in world events and submarine attacks, and the King of Siam himself. Siam’s participation in World War I was the single most important international event for contemporaries in the kingdom, its symbolism unmatched by any other occurrence of the times. The book is the first-ever extensively researched study of Siam and World War I in all its facets. By combining primary sources from Thailand, Germany, France, Great Britain, and Austria, the study describes local events in a global context and explains how world events manifested themselves in the royal palaces and on the streets of Bangkok. The legacy of the events a century ago is remarkably tangible even today, and the book connects the reader with this legacy. The book is easily accessible to the non-specialist reader interested in history and political affairs, as it describes numerous colourful episodes and vignettes, and includes over 300 rare photographs and illustrations, reproduced in high-quality print. The book is published simultaneously in a Thai and an English-language version

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Out of stock

Letters from St Petersburg: A Siamese Prince at the Court of the Last Tsar

The prince was sent to study in Tsarist Russia with all the costs of his 8-year stay paid by the Tsar.The letters he wrote home provide a fascinating insight into the Corps des Pages, where he studied,Tsar Nicholas II and the Imperial family (who treated him like a member of the family) and the role that Siam occupied in Russia’s desire to gain a foothold in the East. As tsarevitch, Nicholas had visited Bangkok in 1891 as part of his Eastern Tour which culminated in the opening of the Eastern end of theTrans-Siberian railway inVladivostock in 1893. Lavishly entertained by King Chulalongkorn, an enduring friendship began, and the Siamese king credited the Tsar with helping prevent further French incursions. Meanwhile the king’s letters to his son are frank and revealing of his thoughts on politics, his family, his health and his plans for the future. Telegrams reacting to important events such as the revolution in 1905 give further insights.A few letters between Prince Chakrabongse and his future wife Ekaterina Desnitskaya before they eloped to Constantinople are also included. Read in conjunction with the formal letters to his father, they provide a glimpse of his state of mind at that time.

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Historians Debate the Rise of the West

$33.90

How and why did Europe rise to world pre-eminence? Providing an overview of this central historical conundrum of modern times, Historians Debate the Rise of the West enables students to grasp major scholars’ evaluations of the biggest picture of all: how Western civilization fits into modern world history. Most historians who write in this area subscribe to a combination of interpretations set forward by scholars of the field, like David Landes, Jared Diamond or Kenneth Pomeranz. But it is often difficult to understand the position they are coming from, and for readers to understand clearly how Europe made the transition from merely one of many developing civilizations to the world’s first industrial power. In this volume, Jonathan Daly introduces us to the main interpretations of Europe’s rise that have been proposed over the past half-century and presents the views of these historians and schools of scholarship, advocating for each point of view and letting each author speak for him or herself through the inclusion of brief textual selections. Also included are interesting biographical details for each scholar, as well as a list of further reading for each chapter and a collection of maps. An ideal introduction for students of world history.

Southeast Asia

$31.90

The first edition of Southeast Asia: An introductory history was published in 1979 and immediately filled a need for travellers and students interested in a tantalisingly different part of the world. Subsequent editions (translated into Japanese, Khmer, Korean and Thai) have continued to document with great perception the enormous changes and dramatic growth experienced in the region. Dr Milton Osborne has been a resident, student and fascinated observer of Southeast Asia for over 50 years. This familiarity has resulted in a highly readable and lively chronicle. While giving due regard to the early history of the region, Osborne concentrates on the changes that have taken place since the eighteenth century: the impact of colonial rule, economic transformations of the 19th and 20th centuries, the emergence and triumph of the independence movements, the impact of social change and the pivotal roles played by religion, ethnic minorities and immigrant groups. He also provides an introduction to the art of the region and a comprehensive guide to literature about Southeast Asia. Clearly written and extensively illustrated this twelfth edition of Southeast Asia: An introductory history remains a classic in the field. ‘While deepening our understanding of Southeast Asia, this fine introduction reminds us of the importance of history itself. ‘ – Anthony Milner, Basham Professor of Asian History, Australian National University