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Let’s Talk With The World – A Child’s Guide to Art and the Natural World

$15.00

A collection of creative activities for children aged from eight to twelve. Drawing, painting, collage, the creative reshaping of maps, working with photocopies and slides, and computer graphics, are all included focusing on a wide range of topics.

Becoming a Critically Reflective Teacher 2nd Edition

$51.00

A practical guide to the essential practice that builds better teachers. Becoming a Critically Reflective Teacher is the landmark guide to critical reflection, providing expert insight and practical tools to facilitate a journey of constructive self-critique. Stephen Brookfield shows how you can uncover and assess your assumptions about practice by viewing them through the lens of your students’ eyes, your colleagues’ perceptions, relevant theory and research, and your own personal experience. Practicing critical reflection will help you? Align your teaching with desired student outcomes See your practice from new perspectives Engage learners via multiple teaching formats Understand and manage classroom power dynamics Model critical thinking for your students Manage the complex rhythms of diverse classrooms This fully revised second edition features a wealth of new material, including new chapters on critical reflection in the context of social media, teaching race and racism, leadership in a critically reflective key, and team teaching as critical reflection. In addition, all chapters have been thoroughly updated and expanded to align with today’s classrooms, whether online or face-to-face, in large lecture formats or small groups. In his own personal voice Stephen Brookfield draws from over 45 years of experience to illustrate the clear benefits of critical reflection. Assumptions guide practice and only when we base our actions on accurate assumptions will we achieve the results we want. Educators with the courage to challenge their own assumptions in an effort to improve learning are the invaluable role models our students need. Becoming a Critically Reflective Teacher provides the foundational information and practical tools that help teachers reach their true potential.

About the Author

STEPHEN D. BROOKFIELD is the John Ireland Endowed Chair at the University of St. Thomas in Minneapolis, Minnesota. For more than 45 years, he has taught in England, Canada, Australia, and the United States. A six-time winner of the Cyril O. Houle Award for Outstanding Literature in Adult Education, he is the author of numerous books on teaching, including The Skillful Teacher (2015), Teaching for Critical Thinking (2011), and The Discussion Book (with Stephen Preskill) (2016), all from Jossey-Bass.

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The Happiness Fantasy

$31.06 $22.50

Happiness has meant different things in different times: according to Aristotle, only the gods could be truly happy, but if you lived ethically, you might come close; for medieval Christians, the best way to be happy was to suffer pain and for Romantic philosophers like Rousseau, society made happiness impossible. But what does it mean to be happy today? In this devastatingly witty new book, Carl Cederstrom traces our present-day fantasy of happiness from its roots in the 60 s counter-culture. He argues that happiness is now defined by a desire to be authentic , to experience physical pleasure, and to cultivate one s brand as an employee. Along the way we encounter the renegade Austrian psychoanalysts, Big Pharma, Californian bohemians, self-help gurus and Silicon Valley CEOs who have all contributed to our current fantasy. Whilst these ideals may have depicted the good life in the 70s, a time of affluence and abundance, they are no longer sustainable in our current age of austerity. It is high time, Cederstrom argues, that we construct new fantasies of happiness.

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Why Does Patriarchy Persist?

$25.81 $22.00

The election of an unabashedly patriarchal man as US President was a shock for many—despite decades of activism on gender inequalities and equal rights, how could it come to this? What is it about patriarchy that seems to make it so resilient and resistant to change? Undoubtedly it endures in part because some people benefit from the unequal advantages it confers. But is that enough to explain its stubborn persistence? In this highly original and persuasively argued book, Carol Gilligan and Naomi Snider put forward a different view: they argue that patriarchy persists because it serves a psychological function. By requiring us to sacrifice love for the sake of hierarchy, patriarchy protects us from the vulnerability of loving and becomes a defense against loss. Uncovering the powerful psychological mechanisms that underpin patriarchy, the authors show how forces beyond our awareness may be driving a politics that otherwise seems inexplicable.

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The Nature of Emotion: Fundamental Questions 2nd Edition

$139.00 $114.50

Building on the legacy of the groundbreaking first edition, the Editors of this unique volume have selected more than 100 leading emotion researchers from around the world and asked them to address 14 fundamental questions about the nature and origins of emotion. For example: What is an emotion? How are emotions organized in the brain? How do emotion and cognition interact? How are emotions embodied in the social world? How and why are emotions communicated? How are emotions physically embodied? What develops in emotional development? At the end of each chapter, the Editors–Andrew Fox, Regina Lapate, Alexander Shackman, and Richard Davidson–highlight key areas of agreement and disagreement. In the final chapter–The Nature of Emotion: A Research Agenda for the 21st Century–the Editors outline their own perspective on the most important challenges facing the field today and the most fruitful avenues for future research. Not a textbook offering a single viewpoint, The Nature of Emotion reveals the central issues in emotion research and theory in the words of many of the leading scientists working in the field today, from senior researchers to rising stars, providing a unique and highly accessible guide for students, researchers, and clinicians.

About the Author

Dr. Fox is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychology and a Neuroscience and Behavior Core Scientist in the California National Primate Research Center at the University of California, Davis. His work as a translational affective neuroscientist aims to bridge basic neuroscientific findings to our understanding of human emotion. Dr. Lapate is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute at the University of California, Berkeley. She has published a number of articles in leading psychology and neuroscience journals on the neural bases of emotion regulation and on individual differences in affective style. Her work is currently supported by the National Institute of Mental Health. Dr. Shackman is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychology, a member of the executive board for the Neuroscience and Cognitive Science (NACS) Program, a core faculty member of the Maryland Neuroimaging Center, and the Director of the Affective and Translational Neuroscience Laboratory at the University of Maryland. He has published more than 50 articles and chapters focused on the neurobiology of emotion-related traits, states, and disorders and his work has been supported by the National Science Foundation and National Institutes of Mental Health and Drug Abuse. He serves as an Associate or Consulting Editor at Emotion; Cognition and Emotion; Cognitive, Affective and Behavioral Neuroscience; and Personality Neuroscience. Dr. Davidson’s research is broadly focused on the neural bases of emotion and emotional style and methods to promote human flourishing including meditation and related contemplative practices. He has published over 375 articles, numerous chapters and reviews and edited 14 books. He was named one of the 100 most influential people in the world by Time Magazine in 2006. He is the author (with Sharon Begley) of The Emotional Life of Your Brain published in 2012.

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Learning to Trust: Attachment Theory and Classroom Management 2nd Edition

$89.07 $61.50

Learning to Trust describes a constructivist approach to classroom management and discipline that was developed by the Child Development Project, a multiyear research and development project that applied attachment theory, care, and self-determination theories to the elementary school classroom. In this book, Marilyn Watson provides an overview of the research on attachment theory and a detailed description of its implications for teaching and classroom management, while chronicling one teacher, Laura Ecken, and her second-third grade class in a high poverty school across two years as she implements the Child Development Project and manages the class, guided by attachment theory. Watson documents in detail Laura’s day by day and week by week efforts to build caring, trusting relationships with and among her students and describes the many steps Laura takes to guide the class into becoming a caring, learning community while also meeting her students’ individual needs for autonomy and competence. Of course, not all goes well in this very real classroom and the ways Laura manages the pressures of competition and students’ many misbehaviors, ordinary and serious, are clearly and sometimes humorously described. Such teaching is not easy, and is counter to more controlling management approaches common in many schools. The book concludes with a chapter on how teachers might find support in their current schools for this more collaborative approach to classroom management, as well as a chapter that includes reflections from a number of the students seven years after leaving the class.

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Object Lessons: How Nineteenth-Century Americans Learned to Make Sense of the Material World

$96.96 $70.30

Object Lessons: How Nineteenth-Century Americans Learned to Make Sense of the Material World examines the ways material things–objects and pictures–were used to reason about issues of morality, race, citizenship, and capitalism, as well as reality and representation, in the nineteenth-century United States. For modern scholars, an “object lesson” is simply a timeworn metaphor used to describe any sort of reasoning from concrete to abstract. But in the 1860s, object lessons were classroom exercises popular across the country. Object lessons helped children to learn about the world through their senses–touching and seeing rather than memorizing and repeating–leading to new modes of classifying and comprehending material evidence drawn from the close study of objects, pictures, and even people. In this book, Sarah Carter argues that object lessons taught Americans how to find and comprehend the information in things–from a type-metal fragment to a whalebone sample. Featuring over fifty images and a full-color insert, this book offers the object lesson as a new tool for contemporary scholars to interpret the meanings of nineteenth-century material, cultural, and intellectual life.

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Justice for Children and Families: A Developmental Perspective

$71.52 $58.00

Children come into the world completely helpless, and require well-functioning families and schools to meet their needs, protect their interests and nurture their potential. This book argues that healthy child-development depends on values, ideas and structures that promote justice for children and families; in particular, checks and balances that favour: * Fairness: allowing fair distribution of resources, so that every child and family have the best possible chance to reach their potential. * Protection: resources for families, neighbourhoods and schools to help protect and encourage their children, alongside the means to intervene, should this protection fail. * Autonomy: encouraging children’s voice and participation in decision-making at a level commensurate with their maturity. Authored by leading experts in the field, the book is comprised of short, highly readable chapters with an interdisciplinary appeal, for practitioners of social science, law, social work, psychology, paediatrics, psychotherapy, psychiatry and public health alike.

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Life-Span Development 17e

Out of stock
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China in Africa: Strategic Motives and Economic Interests

$66.14 $52.00

China’s expansion and growing influence in Africa is arguably the most remarkable global political and economic development in the 21st century. China’s foray into Africa started in the late 1990s, propelled by its desire to obtain new sources of raw materials and energy for its economic growth, as well as new markets for its manufactured goods. While China’s “no political strings attached” policy proves attractive to many of African leaders, China has been criticized as neo-colonialist, interested solely in stripping Africa of its mineral wealth without proper environmental or social precautions. This book addresses the controversy by exploring the motivations and practices of China’s African engagement, providing a comprehensive account of the intensified interactions between China and African states. The first part examines the debate surrounding whether China has pursued a neo-colonialist path in Africa, by looking at the perception of China by the locals and the challenges that the intensified relationship has posed for African states. The second part analyses China’s strategic motivations to see if Beijing has acquired sustaining power and influence in Africa in competition with the West. The third part focuses on economic and business practices of Chinese companies in Africa, as well as China-Africa trade patterns. The articles in this book were originally published in special issues of the Journal of Contemporary China.

Chinese Discourses on Happiness

$87.00

Happiness is on China’s agenda. From Xi Jinping’s “Chinese Dream” to online chat forums, the conspicuous references to happiness are hard to miss. This groundbreaking volume analyzes how different social groups make use of the concept and shows how closely official discourses on happiness are intertwined with popular sentiments. The Chinese Communist Party’s attempts to define happiness and well-being around family-focused Han Chinese cultural traditions clearly strike a chord with the wider population. The collection highlights the links connecting the ideologies promoted by the government and the way they inform, and are in turn informed by, various deliberations and feelings circulating in the society.

 

Contributors analyze the government’s “happiness maximization strategies,” including public service advertising campaigns, Confucian and Daoist-inflected discourses adapted for the self-help market, and the promotion of positive psychology as well as “happy housewives.” They also discuss forces countering the hegemonic discourse: different forms of happiness in the LGBTQ community, teachings of Tibetan Buddhism that subvert the material culture propagated by the government, and the cynical messages in online novels that expose the fictitious nature of propaganda. Collectively, the authors bring out contemporary Chinese voices engaging with different philosophies, practices, and idealistic imaginings on what it means to be happy.