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Criminal Law in Myanmar

$195.00 $185.50

Criminal Law in Myanmar

The first of itskind, this commentary on the Myanmar Penal Code describes and critically evaluates the general principles of criminal responsibility contained in the Code with a view to assisting the application of the law. The major offences against the person and property are examined. Leading cases from Myanmar, India, Malaysia and Singapore are considered along with relevant cases from other jurisdictions.

Given the antiquity of the Penal Code, this commentary engages with a law reform exercise for each topic covered. The end product is a “General Part” for inclusion in the Penal Code, comprising precise and comprehensible provisions reflecting contemporary views about criminal responsibility.

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Criminal Procedure in Singapore

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Criminal Law

$23.40

The Future of Singapore: Population, Society and the Nature of the State

$38.50

Singapore, like many other advanced economies, has a relatively low, and declining, birth-rate. One consequence of this, and a consequence also of the successful economy, is that migrants are being drawn in, and are becoming an increasing proportion of the overall population. This book examines this crucial development, and assesses its likely impact on Singapore society, politics and the state. It shows that, although Singapore is a multi-ethnic society, migration and the changing ethnic mix are causing increasing strains, putting new demands on housing, education and social welfare, and changing the make-up of the workforce, where the government is responding with policies designed to attract the right sort of talent. The book discusses the growing opposition to migration, and explores how the factors which have underpinned Singapore’s success over recent decades, including a cohesive elite, with a clearly focused ideology, a tightly controlled political system and strong continuity of government, are at risk of being undermined by the population changes and their effects. The book also compares the position in Singapore with other East Asian countries, including Japan, South Korea and the Philippines, which are also experiencing population changes with potentially far-reaching consequences.

About the Author

Kamaludeen Mohamed Nasir is Assistant Professor of Sociology in the School of Humanities and Social Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore Bryan S. Turner is Presidential Professor of Sociology in the Graduate Center, City University of New York and Professor of the Sociology of Religion at the Australian Catholic University (Melbourne).

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Detaining the Immigrant Other: Global and Transnational Issues 1st Edition

This edited text explores immigration detention through a global and transnational lens. Immigration detention is frequently transnational; the complex dynamics of apprehending, detaining, and deporting undocumented immigrants involve multiple organizations that coordinate and often act across nation state boundaries. The lives of undocumented immigrants are also transnational in nature; the detention of immigrants in one country (often without due process and without providing the opportunity to contact those in their country of origin) has profound economic and emotional consequences for their families. The authors explore immigration detention in countries that have not often been previously explored in the literature. Some of these chapters include analyses of detention in countries such as Malaysia, South Africa, Turkey and Indonesia. They also present chapters that are comparative in nature and deal with larger, macro issues about immigration detention in general. The authors’ frequent usage of lived experience in conjunction with a broad scholarly knowledge base is what sets this volume apart from others, making it useful and practical for scholars in the social sciences and anybody interested in the global phenomenon of immigration detention.

About the Author

Rich Furman, MSW, PhD, is Professor of Social Work at the University of Washington, Tacoma. Douglas Epps, MSW, is a former immigration detention officer who spent several years working at one of the largest private detention facilities in the US Greg Lamphear works as an English teacher, and a freelance editor and writer.

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Hacked: A Radical Approach to Hacker Culture and Crime (Alternative Criminology)

Public discourse, from pop culture to political rhetoric, portrays hackers as deceptive, digital villains. But what do we actually know about them? In Hacked, Kevin F. Steinmetz explores what it means to be a hacker and the nuances of hacker culture. Through extensive interviews with hackers, observations of hacker communities, and analyses of hacker cultural products, Steinmetz demystifies the figure of the hacker and situates the practice of hacking within the larger political and economic structures of capitalism, crime, and control.This captivating book challenges many of the common narratives of hackers, suggesting that not all forms of hacking are criminal and, contrary to popular opinion, the broader hacker community actually plays a vital role in our information economy. Hacked thus explores how governments, corporations, and other institutions attempt to manage hacker culture through the creation of ideologies and laws that protect powerful economic interests. Not content to simply critique the situation, Steinmetz ends his work by providing actionable policy recommendations that aim to redirect the focus from the individual to corporations, governments, and broader social issues. A compelling study, Hacked helps us understand not just the figure of the hacker, but also digital crime and social control in our high-tech society.”

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From Deportation to Prison: The Politics of Immigration Enforcement in Post-Civil Rights America (Latina/o Sociology)

Criminal prosecutions for immigration offenses have more than doubled over the last two decades, as national debates about immigration rights and reforms became headline topics. What lies behind this unprecedented increase? Why are immigration violations treated as criminal offenses? How do deportation, detention, and criminal prosecution actually operate, and how do enforcement priorities that target “felons” and “criminals” work in policy and practice? From Deportation to Prison unpacks how immigration enforcement has changed in relation to the Department of Homeland Security’s “Criminal Alien Program,” a program expanded in the 1980s to purge non-citizens from dangerously overcrowded jails and prisons. Patrisia Macias-Rojas interviewed Border Patrol agents, local law enforcement, federal district attorneys and public defenders, border residents, and migrants themselves. The findings reveal how the merging of immigration enforcement and the criminal justice system has transformed arrest and deportation at the U.S.-Mexico border. Macias-Rojas argues that, among other factors, massive federal funding for detention beds and a policy of “criminal alien removal” now drive a federal focus on federal criminal prosecution and imprisonment for immigration offenses. Today’s border policing and immigration law enforcement practices are less concerned with distinguishing immigrants from citizens than with classifying people as either deserving or undeserving of rights: as “victims” or “criminals.” The distinction has serious implications for migrants and residents of predominantly Latina/o border communities, and Macias-Rojas shows how, within this new regime, such strategic divisions serve to justify aggressive punishment for those branded as criminals. Overall, From Deportation to Prison presents a thorough and captivating exploration of how mass incarceration and law and order policies of the past forty years have transformed immigration and border enforcement in unexpected and important ways.

About the Author

Patrisia Macias-Rojas is Assistant Professor of Sociology and Latin American and Latino Studies at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

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Stop and Frisk: The Use and Abuse of a Controversial Policing Tactic

No policing tactic has been more controversial than “stop and frisk,” whereby police officers stop, question and frisk ordinary citizens, who they may view as potential suspects, on the streets. As Michael White and Hank Fradella show in Stop and Frisk, the first authoritative history and analysis of this tactic, there is a disconnect between our everyday understanding and the historical and legal foundations for this policing strategy. First ruled constitutional in 1968, stop and frisk would go on to become a central tactic of modern day policing, particularly by the New York City Police Department. By 2011 the NYPD recorded 685,000 ‘stop-question-and-frisk’ interactions with citizens; yet, in 2013, a landmark decision ruled that the police had over- and mis-used this tactic. Stop and Frisk tells the story of how and why this happened, and offers ways that police departments can better serve their citizens. They also offer a convincing argument that stop and frisk did not contribute as greatly to the drop in New York’s crime rates as many proponents, like former NYPD Police Commissioner Ray Kelly and Mayor Michael Bloomberg, have argued. While much of the book focuses on the NYPD’s use of stop and frisk, examples are also shown from police departments around the country, including Philadelphia, Baltimore, Chicago, Newark and Detroit. White and Fradella argue that not only does stop and frisk have a legal place in 21st-century policing but also that it can be judiciously used to help deter crime in a way that respects the rights and needs of citizens. They also offer insight into the history of racial injustice that has all too often been a feature of American policing’s history and propose concrete strategies that every police department can follow to improve the way they police. A hard-hitting yet nuanced analysis, Stop and Frisk shows how the tactic can be a just act of policing and, in turn, shows how to police in the best interest of citizens.

About the Author

Michael D. White is Professor in the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Arizona State University and the Associate Director of ASU’s Center for Violence Prevention and Community Safety. His publications include Jammed Up: Bad Cops, Police Misconduct, and the New York City Police Department. Henry F. Fradella is Professor and Associate Director in the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Arizona State University. His publications include America’s Courts and the Criminal Justice System.

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After Life Imprisonment: Reentry in the Era of Mass Incarceration (New Perspectives in Crime, Deviance, and Law)

One out of every ten prisoners in the United States is serving a life sentence-roughly 130,000 people. While some have been sentenced to life in prison without parole, the majority of prisoners serving ‘life’ will be released back into society. But what becomes of those people who reenter the everyday world after serving life in prison? In After Life Imprisonment, Marieke Liem carefully examines the experiences of “lifers” upon release. Through interviews with over sixty homicide offenders sentenced to life but granted parole, Liem tracks those able to build a new life on the outside and those who were re-incarcerated. The interviews reveal prisoners’ reflections on being sentenced to life, as well as the challenges of employment, housing, and interpersonal relationships upon release. Liem explores the increase in handing out of life sentences, and specifically provides a basis for discussions of the goals, costs, and effects of long-term imprisonment, ultimately unpacking public policy and discourse surrounding long-term incarceration. A profound criminological examination, After Life Imprisonment reveals the untold, lived experiences of prisoners before and after their life sentences.

About the Author

Marieke Liem is Senior Researcher and chair of the Violence Research Initiative at Leiden University and a Marie Curie Fellow at the Harvard Kennedy School. Robert J. Sampson is Henry Ford II Professor of the Social Sciences at Harvard University and Director of the Boston Area Research Initiative. He is the author of several books, including Great American City: Chicago and the Enduring Neighborhood Effect.

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The Criminal Brain, Second Edition: Understanding Biological Theories of Crime

What is the relationship between criminality and biology? Nineteenth-century phrenologists insisted that criminality was innate, inherent in the offender’s brain matter. While they were eventually repudiated as pseudo-scientists, today the pendulum has swung back. Both criminologists and biologists have begun to speak of a tantalizing but disturbing possibility: that criminality may be inherited as a set of genetic deficits that place one at risk to commit theft, violence, or acts of sexual deviance. But what do these new theories really assert? Are they as dangerous as their forerunners, which the Nazis and other eugenicists used to sterilize, incarcerate, and even execute thousands of supposed “born” criminals? How can we prepare for a future in which leaders may propose crime-control programs based on biology? In this second edition of The Criminal Brain, Nicole Rafter, Chad Posick, and Michael Rocque describe early biological theories of crime and provide a lively, up-to-date overview of the newest research in biosocial criminology. New chapters introduce the theories of the latter part of the 20th century; apply and critically assess current biosocial and evolutionary theories, the developments in neuro-imaging, and recent progressions in fields such as epigenetics; and finally, provide a vision for the future of criminology and crime policy from a biosocial perspective. The book is a careful, critical examination of each research approach and conclusion. Both compiling and analyzing the body of scholarship devoted to understanding the criminal brain, this volume serves as a condensed, accessible, and contemporary exploration of biological theories of crime and their everyday relevance.

About the Author

Nicole Rafter was Professor Emeritus of Criminology at Northeastern University. Her publications include The Crime of All Crimes: Toward a Criminology of Genocide, The Criminal Brain: Understanding Biological Theories of Crime, and, with Michelle Brown, Criminology Goes to the Movies. In 2009, Rafter was awarded the Sutherland Award by the American Society of Criminology for outstanding contributions to the discipline. Chad Posick is Assistant Professor in the Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology at Georgia Southern University. Michael Rocque is Assistant Professor in the Bates Department of Sociology and the Senior Research Advisor for the Maine Department of Corrections.

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The Neighborhood Has Its Own Rules: Latinos and African Americans in South Los Angeles

South Los Angeles is often seen as ground zero for inter-racial conflict and violence in the United States. Since the 1940s, South LA has been predominantly a low-income African American neighborhood, and yet since the early 1990s Latino immigrants-mostly from Mexico and many undocumented-have moved in record numbers to the area. Given that more than a quarter million people live in South LA and that poverty rates exceed 30 percent, inter-racial conflict and violence surprises no one. The real question is: why hasn't there been more? Through vivid stories and interviews, The Neighborhood Has Its Own Rules provides an answer to this question. Based on in-depth ethnographic field work collected when the author, Cid Martinez, lived and worked in schools in South Central, this study reveals the day-to-day ways in which vibrant social institutions in South LA- its churches, its local politicians, and even its gangs-have reduced conflict and kept violence to a level that is manageable for its residents. Martinez argues that inter-racial conflict has not been managed through any coalition between different groups, but rather that these institutions have allowed established African Americans and newcomer Latinos to co-exist through avoidance-an under-appreciated strategy for managing conflict that plays a crucial role in America's low-income communities. Ultimately, this book proposes a different understanding of how neighborhood institutions are able to mitigate conflict and violence through several community dimensions of informal social controls.

About the Author

Cid Martinez is Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of San Diego.

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Foundations of Offender Rehabilitation

$47.10

The past three decades has seen dramatic changes in the way in which the criminal justice system responds to those who break the law. The old claim in the field of correctional psychology that “nothing works” has strongly been refuted in the face of evidence from rehabilitation programmes that do make a difference. The graduate student in forensic psychology could easily be overwhelmed by the plethora of information now available. This new textbook offers a comprehensive approach to forensic and correctional psychology, demonstrating how theory and practise can be applied and integrated. Written by intentionally recognized experts within the field, the authors guide the students through the core theories and concepts that underpin forensic practise within the legal systems of different countries (UK, USA, Canada, Australia and Singapore), show how this knowledge informs current thinking in offender rehabilitation and reintegration and provide a series of case studies looking at sexual offenders, female offender, juveniles and offenders with mental disorders. This book is the perfect overview for graduate students of forensic and correctional psychology engaged with offender rehabilitation and assessment and the psychology of law.

About the Author

Sharon Casey is a Senior Lecturer at Deakin University and member of the Clinical Forensic Group within the Deakin Forensic Psychology Centre. Andrew Day is Professor in Forensic Psychology and Director of the Forensic Psychology Centre at Deakin University. James Vess has over 25 years of clinical and research experience with forensic populations. He is currently a Senior Lecturer and a member of the recently formed Clinical Forensic Research Group of the Centre for Offender Reintegration at Deakin University. Tony Ward, MA(Hons), PhD, DipClinPsyc, is currently Professor of Clinical Forensic Mental Health at Deakin University, Melbourne Australia.