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An Introduction to Historical Linguistics 4th Edition

$35.20

All languages change, just as other aspects of human society are constantly changing. This book is an introduction to the concepts and techniques of diachronic linguistics, the study of language change over time. It covers all themajor areas of historical linguistics, presenting concepts in a clear and concise way. Examples are given from a wide range of languages, with special emphasis on the languages of Australia and the Pacific. While the needs of undergraduate students of linguistics have been kept firmly in mind, the book will also be of interest to the general reader seeking to understand langauge and language change. For this fourth edition, a number of new sections have been written, including many new problems and several datasets. Existing materials have been supplemented with new sections on grammaticalization, tonogenesis, morphological change, and using statistical methods in language classification.

About the Author

Terry Crowley was Senior Lecturer in Linguistics at the University of Waikato in New Zealand. Claire Bowern is Assistant Professor of Linguistics, Yale University.

Anthropological Linguistics: An Introduction

$67.20

This is the first comprehensive textbook in anthropological linguistics to be published for very many years. It provides a remarkably complete and authoritative review of research questions which span the disciplines of linguinitics and anthropology, yet presents a coherent, unified, biologically based view of this cross-disciplinary field. Anthropological linguistics is concerned with the place of language in its social and cultural context, with understanding the role of language in forging and sustaining cultural practices and social structures. While anthropological concept of culture, its subject matter ranges cry widely: from cognitive or psychologically oriented topics such as linguistic, relativity or universals of color terminology, to sociocultural issues such as language and gender, politeness, socialization, language contact, and linguistic engineering.All these topics and many more are addressed here, supported by examples and illustrations from an array of languages, especially those of Southeast Asia and the Pacific. Students will find in this book a careful evaluation of current issues and research questions, giving them a basic, yet well rounded understanding of their importance in a wider field; and they will find in each chapter suggestions for further readings, allowing them to pursue topics of particular interest to them.

About the Author

William A. Foley is Professor of Lingusitics at the University of Sydney. He is author of Functional Syntax and Universal Grammar (with R. van Valin) and The Papuan Languages fo New Guinea, and editor of The Role of Theory in Language Description.

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Bundle A Course in Phonetics 7th Edition + Course Mate Access Card

$97.00 $66.00

Offering the most current coverage available, Course in Phonetics, 7e remains the authoritative text for the study of phonetics. Combining Peter Ladefoged’s student-friendly writing style with Keith Johnson’s comprehensive presentation, the Seventh Edition introduces concepts of speech production, describes speech in acoustic terms, and teaches practical phonetic skills including IPA transcription. Expanded sections on acoustic phonetics and speech motor control bring instructors up to date and help students use tools for digital inspection and manipulation of speech. Numerous updates include MRI images of vocal tracts. In addition, the thoroughly revised companion website includes interactive exercises, instant spectrograms for every chapter, over 4,000 audio files of nearly 100 languages, and maps keyed to sounds of languages where they are spoken. With its broad overview and numerous examples, Course in Phonetics remains the ideal introduction to phonetics – no previous knowledge required!

About the Author

Keith Johnson is a professor of linguistics at the University of California, Berkeley. He received his Ph.D. from Ohio State University and taught in the department of linguistics from 1993 to 2005. Dr. Johnson received postdoctoral fellowships from Indiana University and UCLA, where he worked with Peter Ladefoged and Patricia Keating. His primary research field focuses on the processes of speech perception as they relate to phonetic and phonological theory. Dr. Johnson’s research and teaching on acoustic phonetics and psycholinguistics is widely recognized. The late Peter Ladefoged, preeminent phonetician, founded the UCLA Phonetics Laboratory and was its director from 1962 to 1991. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Edinburgh, Scotland, in 1959. His major research interests included experimental phonetics and describing the sounds of the world’s languages; his ground-breaking fieldwork took him to Europe, Africa, India, Australia, China, and elsewhere to record many languages. He was a member of many professional organizations and president of a few, including the International Phonetic Association (1986-1991) and the Linguistic Society of America (1980). He wrote extensively and was awarded many professional honors.

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Contiguity Theory

Languages differ in the types of overt movement they display. For example, some languages (including English) require subjects to move to a preverbal position, while others (including Italian) allow subjects to remain postverbal. In its current form, Minimalism offers no real answer to the question of why these different types of movements are distributed among languages as they are. In Contiguity Theory, Norvin Richards argues that there are universal conditions on morphology and phonology, particularly in how the prosodic structures of language can be built, and that these universal structures interact with language-specific properties of phonology and morphology. He argues that the grammar begins the construction of phonological structure earlier in the derivation than previously thought, and that the distribution of overt movement operations is largely determined by the grammar’s efforts to construct this structure. Rather than appealing to diacritic features, the explanations will generally be rooted in observable phenomena. Richards posits a different kind of relation between syntax and morphology than is usually found in Minimalism. According to his Contiguity Theory, if we know, for example, what inflectional morphology is attached to the verb in a given language, and what the rules are for where stress is placed in the verb, then we will know where the verb goes in the sentence. Ultimately, the goal is to construct a theory in which a complete description of the phonology and morphology of a given language is also a description of its syntax.

About the Author

Norvin Richards is Professor of Linguistics at MIT and the author of Uttering Trees (MIT Press).

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Creating Language: Integrating Evolution, Acquisition, and Processing

Language is a hallmark of the human species; the flexibility and unbounded expressivity of our linguistic abilities is unique in the biological world. In this book, Morten Christiansen and Nick Chater argue that to understand this astonishing phenomenon, we must consider how language is created: moment by moment, in the generation and understanding of individual utterances; year by year, as new language learners acquire language skills; and generation by generation, as languages change, split, and fuse through the processes of cultural evolution. Christiansen and Chater propose a revolutionary new framework for understanding the evolution, acquisition, and processing of language, offering an integrated theory of how language creation is intertwined across these multiple timescales. Christiansen and Chater argue that mainstream generative approaches to language do not provide compelling accounts of language evolution, acquisition, and processing. Their own account draws on important developments from across the language sciences, including statistical natural language processing, learnability theory, computational modeling, and psycholinguistic experiments with children and adults. Christiansen and Chater also consider some of the major implications of their theoretical approach for our understanding of how language works, offering alternative accounts of specific aspects of language, including the structure of the vocabulary, the importance of experience in language processing, and the nature of recursive linguistic structure.

About the Author

Morten H. Christiansen is Professor of Psychology and Codirector of the Cognitive Science Program at Cornell University. Nick Chater is Professor of Behavioural Science at Warwick Business School, University of Warwick.

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English Historical Semantics

$43.43 $33.00

Providing an ideal introduction to historical semantics, this book offers graduate students and advanced undergraduate students in linguistics an accessible overview of the structural and cognitive approaches to English historical semantics. Focusing primarily on Lexical Semantics, the study of word meaning, the book looks at how such studies help to answer two key questions in Historical Linguistics: how and why languages change. Considering changes both in the meanings of individual word forms and in larger areas of the lexicon, English Historical Semantics illustrates how data can be found and analysed, and explores how Lexical Semantics interacts with other areas of linguistics. In particular, the book describes in detail two of the most essential resources in this field: the Oxford English Dictionary and the Historical Thesaurus of the Oxford English Dictionary. By using corpus data to study historical semantics, this book offers a solid grounding in the basic methodology of how to analyse corpus data, providing students with the tools to explore new words entering the language, and to study language change. With extended case studies including colour and kinship terms, suggestions for further reading, and exercises designed to stimulate reflection and test understanding, this textbook is an invaluable resource and practical guide designed to help students navigate this large and fascinating field. Edinburgh Textbooks on The English Language – Advanced Series Editor: Heinz Giegerich Books in this series provide readers with a detailed description and explanation of key areas in English Language study. The authors presuppose a basic working knowledge of the topic and explore aspects of the linguistics of English for an intermediate or advanced student readership.

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Exam Essentials: Cambridge Advanced Practice Tests 1 with key DVD-ROM 3rd Edition

Exam Essentials is our major British English exam preparation series combining exam preparation, practice, and tips for the revised Cambridge English exams. This effective combination of testing and teaching has proved a popular formula with teachers and students. The first two practice tests in each book are ‘walk-through’ tests. Students are carefully guided through the tests and shown how they work and what they have to do to succeed in each part of the exam. Additional step-by-step support for the Writing paper is offered in all the tests. All of the tests are written by experts in the field, which means that students preparing for the exams experience material that is appropriate for and at a level at least as high as the actual exams. Candidates internationally find the Speaking test very challenging. To help them deal with this, each Practice Test book comes with a DVD-ROM which includes a bespoke video showing a complete Speaking test interview as well as an examiner talking about this part of the exam and giving students expert guidance on how to approach it. The DVD-ROM also features worksheets to use with the interview and all the Listening test files.

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Exam Essentials: Cambridge Advanced Practice Tests 2 with key DVD-ROM 1st Edition

Exam Essentials is our major British English exam preparation series combining exam preparation, practice, and tips for the revised Cambridge English exams. This effective combination of testing and teaching has proved a popular formula with teachers and students. The first two practice tests in each book are ‘walk-through’ tests. Students are carefully guided through the tests and shown how they work and what they have to do to succeed in each part of the exam. Additional step-by-step support for the Writing paper is offered in all the tests. All of the tests are written by experts in the field, which means that students preparing for the exams experience material that is appropriate for and at a level at least as high as the actual exams. Candidates internationally find the Speaking test very challenging. To help them deal with this, each Practice Test book comes with a DVD-ROM which includes a bespoke video showing a complete Speaking test interview as well as an examiner talking about this part of the exam and giving students expert guidance on how to approach it. The DVD-ROM also features worksheets to use with the interview and all the Listening test files.

About the Author

Tom Bradbury has been an English language teacher for many years in various parts of Europe and Latin America as well as the UK. He is also an examiner and an experienced writer of various EFL and ESOL exams, practice test books and teaching materials.

Eunice Yeates was an English teacher in Japan for a number of years before turning her attention to the textbook side of English language learning. She has worked in publishing since 1999 and has written extensively for both teachers and students, with a particular focus on assessment content and exam preparation materials.

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Exam Essentials: Cambridge First Practice Tests 1 with key DVD-ROM 3rd Edition

Exam Essentials is our major British English exam preparation series combining exam preparation, practice, and tips for the revised Cambridge English exams. This effective combination of testing and teaching has proved a popular formula with teachers and students. The first two practice tests in each book are ‘walk-through’ tests. Students are carefully guided through the tests and shown how they work and what they have to do to succeed in each part of the exam. Additional step-by-step support for the Writing paper is offered in all the tests. All of the tests are written by experts in the field, which means that students preparing for the exams experience material that is appropriate for and at a level at least as high as the actual exams. Candidates internationally find the Speaking test very challenging. To help them deal with this, each Practice Test book comes with a DVD-ROM which includes a bespoke video showing a complete Speaking test interview as well as an examiner talking about this part of the exam and giving students expert guidance on how to approach it. The DVD-ROM also features worksheets to use with the interview and all the Listening test files.

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German Phonetics and Phonology: Theory and Practice

An essential introduction to the pronunciation of modern German, this unique classroom text is designed to help mid- to upper-level undergraduate students of German produce more accurate and comprehensible German speech. Written in English in a clear and engaging style and employing a minimum of technical jargon, it is the first German phonetics and phonology text to focus on theory and practice, covering topics ranging from the analysis of one’s own speech to historical developments and regional variation. This work includes a wealth of exercises supported by an ancillary website audio program designed to help students perceive and produce sounds and prosodic features more accurately. Addressing topics such as word stress, sentence stress, and intonation as well as the pronunciation of individual sounds, this one-of-a-kind primer provides its users with a solid basis in German phonetics and phonology in order to improve their pronunciation of German.

About the Author

Mary Grantham O’Brien is associate professor of German at the University of Calgary in Canada, where she lives. Sarah M. B. Fagan is professor of German at the University of Iowa, where she lives.

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Impossible Languages (MIT Press)

Can there be such a thing as an impossible human language? A biologist could describe an impossible animal as one that goes against the physical laws of nature (entropy, for example, or gravity). Are there any such laws that constrain languages? In this book, Andrea Moro — a distinguished linguist and neuroscientist — investigates the possibility of impossible languages, searching, as he does so, for the indelible “fingerprint” of human language. Moro shows how the very notion of impossible languages has helped shape research on the ultimate aim of linguistics: to define the class of possible human languages. He takes us beyond the boundaries of Babel, to the set of properties that, despite appearances, all languages share, and explores the sources of that order, drawing on scientific experiments he himself helped design. Moro compares syntax to the reverse side of a tapestry revealing a hidden and apparently intricate structure. He describes the brain as a sieve, considers the reality of (linguistic) trees, and listens for the sound of thought by recording electrical activity in the brain. Words and sentences, he tells us, are like symphonies and constellations: they have no content of their own; they exist because we listen to them and look at them. We are part of the data.

About the Author

Andrea Moro is Professor of General Linguistics at the Institute for Advanced Study IUSS Pavia, Italy, where he is also Director of the Research Center for Neurolinguistics and Theoretical Syntax (NEtS). He is the author of The Boundaries of Babel: The Brain and the Enigma of Impossible Languages (MIT Press) and other books.

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Language Maintenance and Shift

$52.80

What motivates some linguistic minorities to maintain their language? Why do others shift away from it rather quickly? Are there specific conditions – environmental or personal – influencing these dynamics? What can families and communities do to pass on their ‘threatened’ language to the next generation? These and related questions are investigated in detail in Language Maintenance and Shift. In this fascinating book, Anne Pauwels analyses the patterns of language use exhibited by individuals and groups living in multilingual societies, and explores their efforts to maintain their heritage or minority language. She explores the various methods used to analyse language maintenance, from linguistic demography to linguistic biography, and offers guidance on how to research the language patterns and practices of linguistic minorities around the world.

Linguistics and English Literature

$117.00

Concise and engaging, this textbook introduces stylistics, the application of linguistics to literary analysis. Assuming no prior knowledge of linguistics, H. Douglas Adamson discusses linguistics before addressing its application to literature, enabling students to become knowledgeable in both fields. Targeted specifically at undergraduate literature students, the book covers a wide range of topics in linguistics and literary criticism, as well as a variety of literary genres and popular culture, from poems and contemporary literature to comic book art and advertising. Providing numerous examples throughout, linguistic concepts are clearly and accessibly presented in an easy-to-digest way, accompanied by numerous examples and a glossary of key terms. Each chapter features exercises, inviting students to apply specific linguistic knowledge to the analysis of literary texts, as well as further reading suggestions, figures and tables, and highlighted key terms. Supplementary online resources include additional exercises, further reading suggestions, useful links, discussion questions, key term flashcards, and an answer booklet for instructors.

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Linguistics and English Literature: An Introduction

$51.15 $48.50

Concise and engaging, this textbook introduces stylistics, the application of linguistics to literary analysis. Assuming no prior knowledge of linguistics, H. D. Adamson discusses linguistics before addressing its application to literature, enabling students to become knowledgeable in both fields. Targeted specifically at undergraduate literature students, the book covers a wide range of topics in linguistics and literary criticism, as well as a variety of literary genres and popular culture, from poems and contemporary literature to comic book art and advertising. Providing numerous examples throughout, linguistic concepts are clearly and accessibly presented in an easy-to-digest way, accompanied by numerous examples and a glossary of key terms. Each chapter features exercises, inviting students to apply specific linguistic knowledge to the analysis of literary texts, as well as further reading suggestions, figures and tables, and highlighted key terms. Supplementary online resources include additional exercises, further reading suggestions, useful links, discussion questions, key term flashcards, and an answer booklet for instructors.

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Multiple Voices: An Introduction to Bilingualism 1st Edition

Multiple Voices: An Introduction to Bilingualism provides a comprehensive overview of all major aspects of bilingualism. It is primarily concerned with bilingualism as a socio-political phenomenon in the world and, as such, emphasizes languages in contact, language maintenance and shift, language policy (including educational policies), and language as a social identity marker. Other topics discussed include the grammatical or cognitive aspects of bilingualism, such as codeswitching and convergence, how bilingualism appears to be organized in the brain, and how child bilingualism differs from bilingualism acquired at a later age. Designed for upper-level undergraduate or beginning graduate students, this textbook includes many detailed examples from all over the world and is written accessibly by a prominent bilingualism researcher.

About the Author

Carol Myers-Scotton is Carolina Distinguished Professor Emerita in the Linguistics Program and Department of English at the University of South Carolina. Her numerous publications include Contact Linguistics: Bilingual Encounters and Grammatical Outcomes (2002) and Social Motivations for Codeswitching: Evidence from Africa (1993).

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No One’s Ways: An Essay on Infinite Naming

Homer recounts how, trapped inside a monster’s cave, with nothing but his wits to call upon, Ulysses once saved himself by twisting his name. He called himself Outis: “No One,” or “Non-One,” “No Man,” or “Non-Man.” The ploy was a success. He blinded his barbaric host and eluded him, becoming anonymous, for a while, even as he bore a name. Philosophers never forgot the lesson that the ancient hero taught. From Aristotle and his commentators in Greek, Arabic, Latin, and more modern languages, from the masters of the medieval schools to Kant and his many successors, thinkers have exploited the possibilities of adding “non -” to the names of man . Aristotle is the first to write of “indefinite” or “infinite” names, his example being “non-man.” Kant turns to such terms in his theory of the infinite judgment, illustrated by the sentence, “The soul is non-mortal.” Such statements play major roles in the philosophies of Maimon, Fichte, Schelling, Hegel, and Hermann Cohen. They are profoundly reinterpreted in the twentieth century by thinkers as diverse as Carnap and Heidegger. Reconstructing the adventures of a particle in philosophy,Daniel Heller-Roazen seeks to show how a grammatical possibility can be an incitement for thought. Yet he also draws a lesson from persistent examples. The philosophers’ infinite names all point to one subject: us. “Non-man” or “soul,” “Spirit” or “the unconditioned,” we are beings who name and name ourselves, bearing witness to the fact that we are, in every sense, unnamable.

About the Author

Daniel Heller-Roazen is the Arthur W. Marks ’19 Professor of Comparative Literature and the Council of the Humanities at Princeton University. He is the author of Echolalias: On the Forgetting of Language, The Inner Touch: Archaeology of a Sensation, The Enemy of All: Piracy and the Law of Nations, and The Fifth Hammer: Pythagoras and the Disharmony of the World, all published by Zone Books.

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North Borneo Sourcebook: Vocabularies and Functors

North Borneo Sourcebook seeks to address the lack of available data for the languages of northern Borneo, where forty to fifty distinct languages are spoken in the Malaysian state of Sabah alone. While members of the Summer Institute of Linguistics (SIL) have worked in Sabah for several decades and have published articles on individual languages, until now no comprehensive survey of the languages of Sabah had yet been done. In addition to the languages native to Sabah, also included in this monograph are closely related Southwest Sabah languages spoken in neighboring parts of the Malaysian state of Sarawak, the Indonesian province of Kalimantan Utara, and Brunei Darussalam. The author has included 594 entries with equivalents in each of the forty-six languages that represent the linguistic variation in north Borneo, along with introductory sections listing the personal pronouns, demonstrative pronouns, and case markers for each language. This sourcebook thus fills a critical need in surveying the languages of a single large area in an island of Southeast Asia. Many language communities in this region are endangered and likely to disappear as functioning entities within the next generation or two; this book may be the only record we will ever have of their existence. Linguists and those with an interest in Austronesian languages will appreciate the breadth and detail that illuminate the linguistic scene in an area where before there had been only pinpoints of light.

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Sociolinguistics: A Very Short Introduction

Sociolinguistics deals with the social life of language, language in its sociocultural context. It is a branch of linguistics that looks less at the shape or sound of words–morphology or phonology–and more at how our words and sentences are influenced by the society around us–for instance, how the accent or the dialect we use has been shaped by where we come from or which social class we belong to.

In this Very Short Introduction, John Edwards offers the most up-to-date brief overview available of sociolinguistics, with side trips into the sociology of language and psycholinguistics. He considers such topics as the different social evaluations of languages and dialects, the loaded significance of names, and the importance of politically-driven language planning and policy. The relationship between language and gender, sexist language, the language of poverty, and the intertwining of language and religion are also dealt with here. Edwards stresses that, while linguists see all dialects as equally valid, in the wider world powerful attitudes have always placed language varieties in social hierarchies. The author also looks at language more broadly, examining the ways in which languages rise or fall, the attempts to revive flagging or endangered varieties, the reasons why some languages came to dominate others, and the special dynamics that affect contact between “big” and “small” languages.

In both its role as our most powerful tool of communication and as the most immediate symbolic marker of human affiliation, language is pre-eminently a social phenomenon. This compact volume offers an invaluable introduction to this vital aspect of language.

About the Series:

Oxford’s Very Short Introductions series offers concise and original introductions to a wide range of subjects–from Islam to Sociology, Politics to Classics, Literary Theory to History, and Archaeology to the Bible. Not simply a textbook of definitions, each volume in this series provides trenchant and provocative–yet always balanced and complete–discussions of the central issues in a given discipline or field. Every Very Short Introduction gives a readable evolution of the subject in question, demonstrating how the subject has developed and how it has influenced society. Eventually, the series will encompass every major academic discipline, offering all students an accessible and abundant reference library. Whatever the area of study that one deems important or appealing, whatever the topic that fascinates the general reader, the Very Short Introductions series has a handy and affordable guide that will likely prove indispensable.

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The Oxford Guide to Etymology

$39.20

This practical introduction to word history investigates every aspect of where words come from and how they change. Philip Durkin, chief etymologist of the Oxford English Dictionary, shows how different types of evidence can shed light on the myriad ways in which words change in form and meaning. He considers how such changes can be part of wider linguistic processes, or be influenced by a complex mixture of social and cultural factors. He illustrates every point with a wide range of fascinating examples. Dr Durkin investigates folk etymology and other changes which words undergo in everyday use. He shows how language families are established, how words in different languages can have a common ancester, and the ways in which the latter can be distinguished from words introduced through language contact. He examines the etymologies of the names of people and places. His focus is on English but he draws many examples from languages such as French, German, and Latin which cast light on the pre-histories of English words. The Oxford Guide to Etymology is reliable, readable, instructive, and enjoyable. Everyone interested in the history of words will value this account of an endlessly fascinating subject.