Showing all 9 results

Out of stock

Ecolinguistics: Language, Ecology and the Stories We Live By

The increasingly rapid destruction of the ecological systems that support life is calling into question some of the fundamental stories that we live by: stories of unlimited economic growth, of consumerism, progress, individualism, success, and the human domination of nature. Ecolinguistics shows how linguistic analysis can help reveal the stories we live by, open them up to question, and contribute to the search for new stories. Bringing together the latest ecolinguistic studies with new theoretical insights and practical analyses, this book charts a new course for ecolinguistics as an engaged form of critical enquiry. Featuring: * A framework for understanding the theory of ecolinguistics and applying it practically in real life; * Exploration of diverse topics from consumerism in lifestyle magazines to Japanese nature haiku; * A comprehensive glossary giving concise descriptions of the linguistic terms used in the book; * Discourse analysis of a wide range of texts including newspapers, magazines, advertisements, films, nonfiction books, and visual images. This is essential reading for undergraduates, postgraduates and researchers working in the areas of Discourse Analysis and Language and Ecology.

About the Author

Arran Stibbe is a Reader in Ecological Linguistics at the University of Gloucestershire. He is author of Animals Erased: discourse, ecology and reconnection with the natural world (Wesleyan University Press). He has been awarded a National Teaching Fellowship and Senior Fellowship of the Higher Education Academy in recognition of teaching excellence.

Out of stock
Out of stock

Tropical Forests and Global Atmospheric Change

Tropical forests represent the world’s most biodiverse ecosystems and play a key role in hydrology, carbon storage and exchange. Many of the human-induced pressures these regions are facing, e.g. fragmentation and deforestation, have been widely reported and well documented. However, there have been surprisingly few efforts to synthesize cutting-edge science in the area of tropical forest interaction with atmospheric change. At a time when our global atmosphere is undergoing a period of rapid change, both in terms of climate and in the cycling of essential elements such as carbon and nitrogen, a thorough and up-to-date analysis is now timely. This research level text, suitable for graduate level students as well as professional researchers in plant ecology, tropical forestry, climate change science, and conservation biology, explores the vigorous contemporary debate as to how rapidly tropical forests may be affected by atmospheric change, and what this may mean for their future.

About the Author

Oliver Phillips is Reader in Tropical Ecology in the Earth and Biosphere Institute, School of Geography, University of Leeds, UK, and Visiting Researcher at the Missouri Botanical Garden, St. Louis, USA. He was awarded the British Ecological Society’s ‘Founder Prize’ in 2004 for outstanding early career ecological research.

Out of stock
Out of stock

Essentials of Ecology 4th Edition

Essentials of Ecology, 4th Edition presents introductory ecology in an accessible, state-of-the-art format designed to cultivate the novice student’s understanding of, and fascination with, the natural world. This new edition has been updated throughout, with new, full-color illustrations, and comes with an accompanying website with downloadable illustrations, multiple-choice questions, and interactive models.

Out of stock
Out of stock

Mining in Ecologically Sensitive Landscapes 1st Edition

Many areas of unusual geology that contain ore bearing bodies also support unique ecological communities of plants and animals. Where we have increasing demand to exploit rich mineral deposits this can lead to a conflict between mining and conservation interests in such landscapes. The book of which the concept is based in the interface between geology and botany and mining and conservation, brings together experts in the field of mining and conservation. The book focusses on natural and semi-natural ecosystems, where landscape beauty, biodiversity and conservation value are at their highest measure and the mineral wealth they contain can bring affluence of regional or even national importance. Examples of conflicts ranging from threatened floristic endemics to human ecology has been covered, with examples from Africa, the Americas, and Australasia.

About the Author

Professor Mark Tibbett is a plant and soil scientist with over 25 years’ experience in research and teaching. He specialises in element cycling and plant-microbe-soil interactions with particular interest in soil microbial ecology, mycorrhiza and the rhizosphere. Having completed postdoctoral, academic and industry appointments in the UK, he spent 10 years in Australia at CSIRO Land & Water and as the director of the Centre for Land Rehabilitation at the University of Western Australia. He has published over 100 peer-reviewed scholarly articles, is the Co Editor-in-Chief of the international journal Soil Research and an associate editor of the Australian Journal of Botany and Restoration Ecology. He was an instigator and remains a co-chair of the global ‘Mine Closure’ series of conferences. He is currently Professor of Soil Ecology at the University of Reading, UK.

Out of stock
Out of stock

Urban Ecology: Strategies for Green Infrastructure and Land Use

With increasing global urbanization, the environments and ecologies of cities are often perceived to suffer. While pollution and destruction of green space and species may occur, cities also remain part of natural systems. Cities provide natural processes necessary for survival for humans and other living organisms in urban areas. Urban ecology elucidates some of these processes and sheds light on their importance to healthy, fulfilling urban livelihoods. Urban Ecology: Strategies for Green Infrastructure and Land Use provides background on issues relating to urban ecology and urban natural processes. The first section covers the types, values, and recognition of ecosystem services provided by natural processes in urban areas. The second section details the importance and potential of green spaces in urban areas. The third section focuses on biodiversity traits of cities, and the ways in which urbanization affects biodiversity indicators. Finally, the fourth section covers some of the tools and approaches available for urban planners and designers concerned with improving or maintaining urban environments and the services they provide. This easily accessible reference volume offers a comprehensive guide to this rapidly growing field. Case studies and up-to-date research provide urban planners with new options for creating cities that will meet the demands of the twenty-first century. Also appropriate for graduate students who are preparing for careers related to urban planning, this compendium captures and integrates the current work being done in this vitally important field.

About the Author

Kim Etingoff has a master’s degree in urban and environmental policy and planning from Tufts University. Her recent experience includes researching a report on food resiliency within the city of Boston with Initiative for a Competitive Inner City. She worked in partnership with Dudley Street Neighborhood Initiative and Alternatives for Community and Environment to support a community food-planning process based in a Boston neighborhood, which was oriented toward creating a vehicle for community action around urban food issues, providing extensive background research to ground the resident-led planning process. She has worked in the Boston Mayor’s Office of New Urban Mechanics, and has also coordinated and developed programs in urban agriculture and nutrition education. In addition, she has many years of experience researching, writing, and editing educational and academic books on environmental and food issues.

Out of stock
Out of stock

Alkaloids: Chemistry, Biology, Ecology, and Application 2nd Edition

Alkaloids – Secrets of Life: Alkaloid Chemistry, Biological Significance, Applications and Ecological Role, Second Edition provides knowledge on structural typology, biosynthesis and metabolism in relation to recent research work on alkaloids, considering an organic chemistry approach to alkaloids using biological and ecological explanation. The book approaches several questions and unresearched areas that persist in this field of research. It provides a beneficial text for academics, professionals or anyone who is interested in the fascinating subject of alkaloids. Each chapter features an abstract. Appendices, a listing of alkaloids, and plants containing alkaloids are all included, as are basic protocols of alkaloid analysis. * Presents the ecological role of alkaloids in nature and ecosystems interdisciplinary* Examines alkaloids from chemistry, biology and ecology viewpoints* A single handy reference volume comprehensively reviews the origin of alkaloids and their biological uses* Over 80% new information, including new chapters on the ecological role of alkaloids in nature and ecosystems and extraction of alkaloids

About the Author

Former (retired 2014) Professor in Applied Botany, University of Eastern Finland, Faculty of Science and Forestry, Department of Biology, Research and Teaching Laboratory of Applied Botany, Joensuu Campus. Internationally known, Chair of Phytochemical Section of the Botanical Society of America. Lifetime scientific title of docent in applied botany. Gold Medal for a Long Service to the Scientic Community.

Out of stock
Out of stock

Political Ecology: A Critical Introduction 2nd Edition

This fully updated new edition introduces the core concepts, central thinkers, and major works of the burgeoning field of political ecology.* Explores the key arguments and contemporary explanatory challenges facing the sub-discipline* Provides the first full history of the development of political ecology over the last century and its theoretical underpinnings* Considers the major challenges facing the field now and for the future* Study boxes introduce key figures in the development of the discipline and summarize their most important works* Fully updated to include recent events, such as the Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill, as well as both urban and rural examples, from the developed and underdeveloped world.

About the Author

Paul Robbins is Professor and Director of the School of Geography and Development at the University of Arizona. He is the author of numerous publications including World Regions in a Global Context: People, Places, and Environments (with S. Marston, P.Knox, D. Liverman and V. Del Casino, 2010), Environment and Society: A Critical Introduction (with J. Hintz and S. Moore, Wiley-Blackwell, 2010), and Global Political Ecology (co-edited with R. Peet and M. Watts, 2011).

 

Out of stock
Out of stock

GIS Based Chemical Fate Modeling: Principles and Applications

Explains how GIS enhances the development of chemical fate and transport models

Over the past decade, researchers have discovered that geographic information systems (GIS) are not only excellent tools for managing and displaying maps, but also useful in the analysis of chemical fate and transport in the environment. Among its many benefits, GIS facilitates the identification of critical factors that drive chemical fate and transport. Moreover, GIS makes it easier to communicate and explain key model assumptions.

Based on the author’s firsthand experience in environmental assessment, GIS Based Chemical Fate Modeling explores both GIS and chemical fate and transport modeling fundamentals, creating an interface between the two domains. It then explains how GIS analytical functions enable scientists to develop simple, yet comprehensive spatially explicit chemical fate and transport models that support real-world applications. In addition, the book features:

  • Practical examples of GIS based model calculations that serve as templates for the development of new applications
  • Exercises enabling readers to create their own GIS based models
  • Accompanying website featuring downloadable datasets used in the book’s examples and exercises
  • References to the literature, websites, data repositories, and online reports to facilitate further research
  • Coverage of important topics such as spatial decision support systems and multi-criteria analysis as well as ecological and human health risk assessment in a spatial context

GIS Based Chemical Fate Modeling makes a unique contribution to the environmental sciences by explaining how GIS analytical functions enhance the development and interpretation of chemical fate and transport models. Environmental scientists should turn to this book to gain a deeper understanding of the role of GIS in describing what happens to chemicals when they are released into the environment.

About the Author

ALBERTO PISTOCCHI, MSc Eng, MSc Phil, PhD, is Adjunct Professor of Spatial Decision Support Systems at the University of Trento, Italy, and the author of several scientific contributions to the fields of hydrology, environmental assessment, chemical fate and transport modeling, and spatial decision support systems. As a researcher, environmental analyst, and project manager, he has been working for the European Commission’s Joint Research Centre, the Emilia Romagna regional government, and other private and public organizations. He is a founding partner (2001) and the scientific director of GECOsistema, a research spin-off from the University of Bologna, Italy.

Out of stock
Out of stock

Food Webs and Biodiversity: Foundations, Models, Data

Food webs have now been addressed in empirical and theoretical research for more than 50 years. Yet, even elementary foundational issues are still hotly debated. One difficulty is that a multitude of processes need to be taken into account to understand the patterns found empirically in the structure of food webs and communities.

 

Food Webs and Biodiversity develops a fresh, comprehensive perspective on food webs. Mechanistic explanations for several known macroecological patterns are derived from a few fundamental concepts, which are quantitatively linked to field-observables. An argument is developed that food webs will often be the key to understanding patterns of biodiversity at  community level.

 

Key Features:

 

  • Predicts generic characteristics of ecological communities in invasion-extirpation equilibrium.
  • Generalizes the theory of competition to food webs with arbitrary topologies.
  • Presents a new, testable quantitative theory for the mechanisms determining species richness in food webs, and other new results.
  • Written by an internationally respected expert in the field.

 

With global warming and other pressures on ecosystems rising, understanding and protecting biodiversity is a cause of international concern. This highly topical book will be of interest to a wide ranging audience, including not only graduate students and practitioners in community and conservation ecology but also the complex-systems research community as well as mathematicians and physicists interested in the theory of networks.

About the Author

Axel G. Rossberg obtained an M.A. in theoretical physics at the University of Texas at Austin and a Ph.D. in complex-system physics at the University of Bayreuth. Since 2003 he is specializing on food-web theory and community ecology. To foster applications in the management context he recently joined UK’s Centre for Environment, Fisheries & Aquaculture Science (Cefas). He is also Senior Research Fellow at Queen’s University Belfast and Honorary Lecturer at University of East Anglia, and serves on the editorial board of The American Naturalist.

Out of stock