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A Grain of Wheat

$27.50

The Nobel Prize nominated Kenyan writer sbest-known novelSet in the wake of the Mau Mau rebellion and on the cusp of Kenya’s independence from Britain, A Grain of Wheatfollows a group of villagers whose lives have been transformed by the 1952 1960 Emergency. At the center of it all is the reticent Mugo, the village’s chosen hero and a man haunted by a terrible secret. As we learn of the villagers’ tangled histories in a narrative interwoven with myth and peppered with allusions to real-life leaders, including Jomo Kenyatta, a masterly story unfolds in which compromises are forced, friendships are betrayed, and loves are tested. For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust theseries to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-datetranslations by award-winning translators.”

About the Author

Ngugi wa Thiong’o is an award-winning novelist, playwright, and essayist from Kenya whose novels have been translated into more than thirty languages. He lives in Irvine, California, where he is Distinguished Professor of English and Comparative Literature at the University of California, Irvine. Abdulrazak Gurnah is the author of the Booker Prize shortlisted novel Paradise, among other novels. He was born in Zanzibar, Tanzania, and teaches English literature at the University of Kent in England.”

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A Grain of Wheat

A masterly story of myth, rebellion, love, friendship and betrayal from one of Africa’s great writers, Ngugi wa Thiong’o’s A Grain of Wheat includes an introduction by Abdulrazak Gurnah, author of By the Sea, in Penguin Modern Classics. It is 1963 and Kenya is on the verge of Uhuru – Independence Day. The mighty british government has been toppled, and in the lull between the fighting and the new world, colonized and colonizer alike reflect on what they have gained and lost. In the village of Thabai, the men and women who live there have been transformed irrevocably by the uprising. Kihika, legendary rebel leader, was fatally betrayed to the whiteman. Gikonyo’s marriage to the beautiful Mumbi was destroyed when he was imprisoned, while her life has been shattered in other ways. And Mugo, brave survivor of the camps and now a village hero, harbours a terrible secret. As events unfold, compromises are forced, friendships are betrayed and loves are tested. Kenyan novelist and playwright Ngugi wa Thiong’o is the author of Weep Not Child (1964), The River Between (1965), and Petals of Blood (1977). Ngugi was chair of the Department of Literature at the University of Nairobi from 1972 to 1977. He left Kenya in 1982 and taught at various universities in the United States before he became professor of comparative literature and performance studies at New York University in 1992. If you enjoyed A Grain of Wheat, you might like Chinua Achebe’s Things Fall Apart, also available in Penguin Modern Classics. ‘With Ngugi history is a living tissue … this book adds cubits to his already considerable stature’Guardian

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A Passage to India (Penguin Classics)

$22.60

When Adela and her elderly companion Mrs Moore arrive in the Indian town of Chandrapore, they quickly feel trapped by its insular and prejudiced British community. Determined to explore the real India’, they seek the guidance of the charming and mercurial Dr Aziz, a cultivated Indian Muslim. But a mysterious incident occurs while they are exploring the Marabar caves with Aziz, and the well-respected doctor soon finds himself at the centre of a scandal that rouses violent passions among both the British and their Indian subjects. A masterly portrait of a society in the grip of imperialism, A Passage to India compellingly depicts the fate of individuals caught between the great political and cultural conflicts of the modern world.
About the Author

Edward Morgan Forster (1879-1970) wrote six novels – Where Angels Fear to Tread (1905), The Longest Journey (1907), A Room with a View (1908), Howards End (1910), A Passage to India (1924). Maurice , written in 1914, was published posthumously in 1971. He also published two volumes of short stories; two collections of essays; a critical work (Aspects of the Novel); The Hill of Devi; two biographies; two books about Alexandria; and the libretto for Britten’s opera Billy Budd. Pankaj Mishra was born in North India in 1969 and is the author of The Romantics: A Novel and An End to Suffering: The Buddha in the World.

Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass

$17.60

Bored on a hot afternoon, Alice follows a White Rabbit down a rabbit-hole – without giving a thought about how she might get out. And so she tumbles into Wonderland: where animals answer back, a baby turns into a pig, time stands still at a disorderly tea party, croquet is played with hedgehogs and flamingos, and the Mock Turtle and Gryphon dance the Lobster Quadrille. In a land in which nothing is as it seems and cakes, potions and mushrooms can make her shrink to ten inches or grow to the size of a house, will Alice be able to find her way home again?

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Bridget Jones’s Diary: A Novel

$23.70 $20.00

“Bridget Jones’s Diary” is the devastatingly self-aware, laugh-out-loud account of a year in the life of a thirty-something Singleton on a permanent doomed quest for self-improvement. Caught between the joys of Singleton fun, and the fear of dying alone and being found three weeks later half eaten by an Alsatian; tortured by Smug Married friends asking, “How’s your love life?” with lascivious, yet patronizing leers, Bridget resolves to: reduce the circumference of each thigh by 1.5 inches, visit the gym three times a week not just to buy a sandwich, form a functional relationship with a responsible adult and learn to program the VCR. With a blend of flighty charm, existential gloom, and endearing self-deprecation, “Bridget Jones’s Diary” has touched a raw nerve with millions of readers the world round. Read it and laugh–before you cry, “Bridget Jones is me!”

About the Author

Helen Fielding, a journalist and a novelist, is the author of three Bridget Jones novels, including Bridget Jones s Diary, Bridget Jones: The Edge of Reason, andBridget Jones: Mad About the Boy. Her other novels include Cause Celeb and Olivia Joules and the Overactive Imagination. She also co-wrote the screenplays for the blockbuster movie adaptations of the first two Bridget Jones books as well as for the forthcoming Working Titles film Bridget Jones’s Baby (in theaters September 2016); which she is also an executive producer. Follow her on Twitter @bridgetjoneshf.”

Child of All Nations

$26.40

Pramoedya Ananta Toer has been compared to John Steinbeck (The Washington Post), Nadine Gordimer (The Nation), and Charles Dickens (Publishers Weekly). He shares with Naguib Mahfouz the ability to “achieve what few writers today are able to accomplish: drawing the reader, body and soul, into another world” (Seattle Times). But the Chicago Tribune’s comparison to Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn is particularly apt. Not only is Pramoedya a writer of staggering depth and power, he is also one of his country’s most suppressed dissidents. All his work is banned in his native Indonesia; students have been sentenced to eight years in prison on charges stemming from an arrest for selling his books. In Child of All Nations, the reader is immediately swept up by a story that is profoundly feminist, devastatingly anticolonialist – and full of heartbreak, suspense, love, and fury. Pramoedya immerses the reader in a world that is astonishing in its vividness: the cultural whirlpool that was the Dutch East Indies of the 1890s. A story of awakening, it follows Minke, the main character of This Earth of Mankind, as he struggles to overcome the injustice all around him. Pramoedya’s full literary genius is evident in the brilliant characters that populate this world: Minke’s fragile Mixed-Race wife; a young Chinese revolutionary; an embattled Javanese peasant and his impoverished family; the French painter Jean Marais, to name just a few. Child of all Nations is the second in the series of four novels often called the Buru tetralogy. Many of the characters from This Earth of Mankind (the first volume) return to stunning effect in Child of All Nations. But this is a novel that can also be read entirely on its own.The Buru tetralogy was composed orally on Buru Island during the first half of the author’s fourteen-year imprisonment without trial. Writing or reading anything but religious texts was strictly forbidden. Pramoedya would tell each installment to the people with whom he shared.

About the Author

Pramoedya Ananta Toer, born on the island of Java in 1925, was imprisoned first by the Dutch, then by the Indonesian government as a political prisoner. He received the PEN Freedom to Write Award and the Ramon Magsaysay Award.

Death of a Salesman (Penguin Plays)

$22.60

The tragedy of a typical American–a salesman who at the age of sixty-three is faced with what he cannot face; defeat and disillusionment.

Economics: The User’s Guide A Pelican Introduction

$21.50

What is economics? What can – and can’t – it explain about the world? Why does it matter? Ha-Joon Chang teaches economics at Cambridge University, and writes a column for the Guardian. The Observer called his book 23 Things They Don’t Tell You About Capitalism, which was a no.1 bestseller, ‘a witty and timely debunking of some of the biggest myths surrounding the global economy.’ He won the Wassily Leontief Prize for advancing the frontiers of economic thought, and is a vocal critic of the failures of our current economic system.

Foe

$22.00

Nobel Laureate and two-time Booker prize-winning author of “Disgrace” and “The Life and Times of Michael K”, J. M. Coetzee reimagines Daniel DeFoe’s classic novel “Robinson Crusoe in Foe”. In an act of breathtaking imagination, J.M Coetzee radically reinvents the story of Robinson Crusoe. In the early eighteenth century, Susan Barton finds herself adrift from a mutinous ship and cast ashore on a remote desert island. There she finds shelter with its only other inhabitants: a man named Cruso and his tongueless slave, Friday. In time, she builds a life for herself as Cruso’s companion and, eventually, his lover. At last they are rescued by a passing ship, but only she and Friday survive the journey back to London. Determined to have her story told, she pursues the eminent man of letters Daniel Foe in the hope that he will relate truthfully her memories to the world. But with Cruso dead, Friday incapable of speech and Foe himself intent on reshaping her narrative, Barton struggles to maintain her grip on the past, only to fall victim to the seduction of storytelling itself. Treacherous, elegant and unexpectedly moving, Foe remains one of the most exquisitely composed of this pre-eminent author’s works. “A small miracle of a book…of marvellous intricacy and overwhelming power”. (“Washington Post”). “A superb novel”. (“The New York Times”). South African author J. M. Coetzee was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 2003 and was the first author to win the Booker Prize twice for his novels “Disgrace” and “The Life and Times of Michael K”. His novel set during the South African apartheid, “Age of Iron”, winner of the “Sunday Express” Book of the Year award is also available in Penguin paperback.

About the Author

J. M. Coetzee was born in Cape Town, South Africa in 1940. The author of some fifteen novels and winner of numerous awards, Coetzee is the first author to have been awarded the Booker Prize twice: for Life & Times of Michael K in 1983 and for Disgrace in 1999. In 2003 he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature. He lives in Australia.

Footsteps

$26.40

As the world moves into the twentieth century, Minke, one of the few European-educated Javanese, optimistically starts a new life in a new town: Betawi. With his enrollment in medical school and the opportunity to meet new people, there is every reason to believe that he can leave behind the tragedies of the past. But Minke can no more escape his past than he can escape his situation as part of an oppressed people under a foreign power. As his world begins to fall apart, Minke draws a small but fervent group around him to fight back against colonial exploitation. During the struggle, Minke finds love, friendship, and betrayal – with tragic consequences. And he goes from wanting to understand his world to wanting to change it. Pramoedya’s full literary genius is again evident in the remarkable characters that populate the novel – and in his depiction of a people’s painful emergence from colonial domination and the shackles of tradition. It is no wonder that Carolyn See, writing in The Washington Post Book World, commented, “Pramoedya Ananta Toer should get the Nobel Prize, but failing that, where are the miniseries people? This story is spellbinding”. The Buru tetralogy was composed orally on Buru Island during the first half of the author’s fourteen-year imprisonment without trial. Writing or reading anything but religious texts was strictly forbidden. Pramoedya would tell each installment to the people with whom he shared his hut; they in turn would tell others until the thousands of political prisoners held on Buru knew the story. In the latter half of his imprisonment, Pramoedya was allowed to write the novels he had composed orally.

About the Author

Pramoedya Ananta Toer, born on the island of Java in 1925, was imprisoned first by the Dutch, then by the Indonesian government as a political prisoner. He received the PEN Freedom to Write Award and the Ramon Magsaysay Award.

Frankenstein: Or the Modern Prometheus

$14.30

Obsessed by creating life itself, Victor Frankenstein plunders graveyards for the material to fashion a new being, which he shocks into life by electricity. But his botched creature, rejected by Frankenstein and denied human companionship, sets out to destroy his maker and all that he holds dear. Mary Shelley’s chilling gothic tale was conceived when she was only eighteen, living with her lover Percy Shelley near Byron’s villa on Lake Geneva. It would become the world’s most famous work of horror fiction, and remains a devastating exploration of the limits of human creativity.

About the Author

Mary Shelley was born in 1797, the only daughter of writers William Godwin and Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin. In 1814 she eloped with poet Percy Bysshe Shelley, whom she married in 1816. She is best remembered as the author of Frankenstein, but she wrote several other works, including Valperga and The Last Man. She died in 1851. Maurice Hindle studied at the universities of Keele, Durham and Essex, gaining a Ph.D. in Literature from Essex in 1989. He currently teaches at the Open University.

Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In

$22.90

The key text on problem-solving negotiation-updated and revised Since its original publication nearly thirty years ago, Getting to Yes has helped millions of people learn a better way to negotiate. One of the primary business texts of the modern era, it is based on the work of the Harvard Negotiation Project, a group that deals with all levels of negotiation and conflict resolution. Getting to Yes offers a proven, step-by-step strategy for coming to mutually acceptable agreements in every sort of conflict. Thoroughly updated and revised, it offers readers a straight- forward, universally applicable method for negotiating personal and professional disputes without getting angry-or getting taken.

Going Solo: The Extraordinary Rise and Surprising Appeal of Living Alone

$23.40

Going Solo is an examination of the most significant demographic shift since the Baby Boom — the sharp increase in the number of people who live alone. In 1950, only 22 percent of American adults were single. Today, more than 50 percent of American adults are single and 31 million — roughly one out of every seven adults — live alone. In Going Solo, renowned sociologist and author Eric Klinenberg proves that these numbers are more than just a passing trend. They’re actually evidence of the biggest demographic shift since the Baby Boom. We are crafting new ways of living. Klinenberg explores the seismic impact “going solo” is having on culture, business, and politics. Though conventional wisdom tells us that living by oneself leads to loneliness and isolation, the facts tell us that most solo dwellers are deeply engaged in social and civic life. Compared with their married counterparts, they are more likely to eat out and exercise, go to art and music

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Heidi

$18.76 $15.50

What is the exact colour of the yellow brick road in L. Frank Baum’s classic The Wizard of Oz? Or the sprawling green meadows of Prince Edward Island in Anne of Green Gables? The answers lie in Puffin Pantone, a partnership between Puffin Books and Pantone LLC. Combining two beloved household names and creating a line of books that celebrates colour and literature at once. Pairing classic books with their perfect Pantone matches – this is a collection as diverse and boundless as the colour spectrum itself. At the age of five, little orphan Heidi is sent to live with her grandfather in the Alps. Everyone in the village is afraid of him, but Heidi is fascinated by his long beard and bushy grey eyebrows. She loves her life in the mountains, playing in the sunshine and growing up amongst the goats and birds. But one terrible day, Heidi is collected by her aunt and is made to live with a new family in town. Heidi can’t bear to be away from her grandfather; can she find a way back up the mountain, where she belongs?

Invisible Man

$22.60

Ellison’s blistering and impassioned first novel, winner of the prestigious American National Book Award, tells the extraordinary story of a man who is invisible ‘simply because people refuse to see me’. Yet his powerfully depicted adventures – from a terrifying Harlem race riot to his expulsion from a Southern college – go far beyond the story of one man. The lives of countless millions are evoked in this superb portrait of a generation of black Americans.

About the Author

INVISIBLE MAN established Ralph Ellison as the author of one of the most important and influential American novels of the twentieth century. He is remembered as a writer who captured a true sense of the African-American experience. JUNETEENTH joins INVISIBLE MAN and FLYING HOME & OTHER STORIES on the Penguin Modern Classics list.

Jane Eyre

$15.50

A gothic masterpiece of tempestuous passions and dark secrets, Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre is edited with an introduction and notes by Stevie Davis in Penguin Classics. Charlotte Bronte tells the story of orphaned Jane Eyre, who grows up in the home of her heartless aunt, enduring loneliness and cruelty. This troubled childhood strengthens Jane’s natural independence and spirit – which prove necessary when she finds employment as a governess to the young ward of Byronic, brooding Mr Rochester. As her feelings for Rochester develop, Jane gradually uncovers Thornfield Hall’s terrible secret, forcing her to make a choice. Should she stay with Rochester and live with the consequences, or follow her convictions – even if it means leaving the man she loves? A novel of intense power and intrigue, Jane Eyre dazzled readers with its passionate depiction of a woman’s search for equality and freedom.

About the Author

Charlotte Bronte (1816-55), sister of Anne Bronte and Emily Bronte. Jane Eyre appeared in 1847 and was followed by Shirley (1848) and Vilette (1853). In 1854 Charlotte Bronte married her father’s curate, Arthur Bell Nicholls. She died during her pregnancy on March 31, 1855 in Haworth, Yorkshire. The Professor was posthumously published in 1857. Dr Stevie Davis is a novelist, critic and historian. She is Director of Creative writing at the University of Wales Swansea. She is the author of four books on Emily Bronte, three novels, and three books in the Penguin Critical Studies series.

Leaders Eat Last : Why Some Teams Pull Together and Others Don’t

$23.00

The New York Times bestseller by the acclaimed, bestselling author of Start With Why and Together is Better. Now with a new chapter on millennials in the workplace, based on Simon Sinek’s viral video ‘The Millennial Question’ (180+ million views). Imagine a world where almost everyone wakes up inspired to go to work. This is not a crazy, idealised notion. In many successful organisations, great leaders are creating environments in which teams trust each other so deeply that they would put their lives on the line for each other. Yet other teams, no matter what incentives were offered, are doomed to infighting, fragmentation and failure. Why? Today’s workplaces tend to be full of cynicism, paranoia and self-interest. But the best organisations foster trust and cooperation because their leaders build what Sinek calls a Circle of Safety. It separates the security inside the team from the challenges outside. Everyone feels they belong and all energies are devoted to facing the common enemy and seizing big opportunities. As in Start with Why, Sinek illustrates his ideas with fascinating true stories, from the military to manufacturing, from government to investment banking. He shows that leaders who are willing to eat last are rewarded with deeply loyal colleagues who will stop at nothing to advance their vision. It’s amazing how well it works. ‘As refreshingly simple and easy to follow as it is thought-provoking’ Management Today Simon Sinek is the bestselling author of Start with Why, Leaders Eat Last and Together is Better which have helped organizations around the world inspire their people to reach new heights. He has presented his ideas to Fortune 100 companies and small startups; to non-profit organizations and members of Congress; to foreign ambassadors and the highest levels of the US military, among many others. His TED Talk based on Start with Why is the third most popular video of all time on TED.com, with more than 33 million views.

Modern Classics Burmese Days (Penguin Modern Classics)

$23.10

Based on his experiences as a policeman in Burma, George Orwell’s first novel presents a devastating picture of British colonial rule. It describes corruption and imperial bigotry in a society where, ‘after all, natives were natives – interesting, no doubt, but finally…an inferior people’. When Flory, a white timber merchant, befriends Indian Dr Veraswami, he defies this orthodoxy. The doctor is in danger: U Po Kyin, a corrupt magistrate, is plotting his downfall. The only thing that can save him is membership of the all-white Club, and Flory can help. Flory’s life is changed further by the arrival of beautiful Elizabeth Lackersteen from Paris, who offers an escape from loneliness and the ‘lie’ of colonial life. George Orwell’s first novel, inspired by his experiences in the Indian Imperial Police in Burma, Burmese Days includes a new introduction by Emma Larkin in Penguin Modern Classics.

About the Author

Eric Arthur Blair (1903-1950), better known by his pen-name, George Orwell, was born in India, where his father worked for the Civil Service. An author and journalist, Orwell was one of the most prominent and influential figures in twentieth-century literature. His unique political allegory Animal Farm was published in 1945, and it was this novel, together with the dystopia of Nineteen Eighty-Four (1949), which brought him world-wide fame. His novels and non-fiction include Burmese Days, Down and Out in Paris and London, The Road to Wigan Pier and Homage to Catalonia.

Modern Classics To the Lighthouse

$19.00

A pioneering work of modernist fiction, using her unique stream-of-consciousness technique to explore the inner lives of her characters, Virginia Woolf’s “To the Lighthouse” is widely regarded as one of the greatest artistic achievements of the twentieth century. This “Penguin Classics” edition is edited by Stella McNichol, with an introduction and notes by Hermione Lee. “To the Lighthouse” is at once a vivid impressionistic depiction of a family holiday, and a meditation on marriage, on parenthood and childhood, on grief, tyranny and bitterness. For years now the Ramsays have spent every summer in their holiday home in Scotland, and they expect these summers will go on forever; but as the First World War looms, the integrity of family and society will be fatally challenged. With a psychologically introspective mode, the use of memory, reminiscence and shifting perspectives gives the novel an intimate, poetic essence, and at the time of publication in 1927 it represented an utter rejection of Victorian and Edwardian literary values. Virginia Woolf (1882-1941) is regarded as a major 20th century author and essayist, a key figure in literary history as a feminist and modernist, and the centre of ‘The Bloomsbury Group’, an informal collective of artists and writers that exerted a powerful influence over early twentieth-century British culture. Between 1925 and 1931 Virginia Woolf produced what are now regarded as her finest masterpieces, from “Mrs Dalloway” (1925) to the poetic and highly experimental novel “The Waves” (1931). She also maintained an astonishing output of literary criticism, short fiction, journalism and biography, including the playfully subversive “Orlando” (1928) and “A Room of One’s Own” (1929) a passionate feminist essay. If you enjoyed “To the Lighthouse”, you might like James Joyce’s “A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man”, also available in “Penguin Classics”. “Bears endless re-reading …the sea encircles the story in a brilliant ebb and flow”. (Rachel Billington).

About the Author

Virginia Woolf (1882-1941) is now recognised as a major 20th century author, a great novelist and essayist, and a key figure in literary history as a feminist and modernist.